Hindi: Thanks for the compliment.

albondiga

Senior Member
English/USA
Hi all,

If someone tells me that my Hindi is very good, what would be a colloquial way (in Hindi) for me to respond? Kind of the equivalent of the "Thanks for the compliment" I would say in English (though obviously it need not be an exact translation)...

Thanks!
 
  • bakshink

    Senior Member
    punjabi
    Thanks for the compliment- Prashan.sa ke liye dhanyavaad. Is prashan.sa ke liye dhanyavaad.

    Normally we will just say "Dhanyavaad or Shukriya".
    प्रशंसा, आदर, समादर, सम्मान, अभिनन्दन: These words are in order of weight
    प्रशंसोक्ति : statement of praise
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Normally when someone praises you for anything you just say <dhanyavaad or shukriyaa>, as bakshink says, or the variation: aap kaa bahut shukriyaa.

    But one can also add the following expression for added politeness in Urdu:

    <aap kii baRii nawaazish hai> or just <baRii nawaazish>.

    Omlick, you can respond to somene praising you by you using expressions employing the word <ta'reef / ta'riif तारीफ़>, but usually we don't do that / don't have to. In fact, where I come from it is considered prudent to say as little as possible in response here, except the minimum to avoid looking rude. The idea is to move on to something else rather than remain a subject of attention.
     

    albondiga

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    Thanks all!

    Actually I thought to ask this based on compliments that people had sent me in emails, that's why I was going to specify "... for the compliments" so that they would know for what I was thanking them (the emails were obviously longer and contained much more than just compliments :))... in one I'm replying to now there were <shubhkamaaniyaan> as well (for my continued studies), so maybe "aapkii prashaNsaa aur shubhkamaaniyon ke liye dhanyavaad"... I think it sounds a bit "heavy", but some of the emails I'd be replying to were like that too. :)

    I guess in spoken Hindi I had always just said "shukriyaa" or "dhanyavaad" as well, but maybe that was because I couldn't come up with anything more... :) Glad to know it's what I should do anyway!
     
    Last edited:

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    In fact, where I come from it is considered prudent to say as little as possible in response here, except the minimum to avoid looking rude. The idea is to move on to something else rather than remain a subject of attention.
    Absolutely a Lakhnavī practice, and if executed well, people will commend your Urdu (which evidently goes hand in hand with a prudent response).

    I remember hearing people reply with a self abasing attitude at times too (<ham nāchīz> type). I can't remember some of the highfalutin ways that people use to deflect a comment, but here is an simple one to seem humble:

    X: <bhaiyā, aapko baD.ī acchī urdū ātī hai>
    Y: <nahī.n jī, ham to bas sikh rahe hai.n>

    What does everyone else think?
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    PG, you are absolutely right that for self-abasement we often use < ham nāchīz … > or <yeh nāchīz …> <is nāchīz ….>. So in your dialogue above, one could give an answer based very much on this, if the situation really demands. I mean if your saying things like <shukriyā> / <baRī nawāzish> / <baRī ‘ināyat> doesn’t help in deflecting the topic. For example one could say:

    Y: < jī nahī.n, is nāchīz kī Urdu / Hindi abhī qābil-e-ta’rīf nahi.n hai!> <- Omlick here is your < ta'rīf / ta'reef>!
    [Oh no! The Urdu / Hindi of this humble creature is not praiseworthy yet!]

    Alternatively, you could say something like:

    Y: < jī nahī.n, is nāchīz ko to abhī bahut kuchh sīkhnā hai>.

    There are of course yet other ways to say these.

    Please note the revered positions of <jī > and < nahī.n > in Urdu as opposed to Punjabi!
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Please note the revered positions of <jī > and < nahī.n > in Urdu as opposed to Punjabi!
    Thank you. For some reason, "yes" and "no" are so hard for me to remember, probably because many Panjabis maintain these two in their Hindi and Urdu as well.
     

    lcfatima

    Senior Member
    English USA
    I don't think it is just a Lucknavi thing. I was going to say the same thing about that when someone compliments my Urdu/Hindi, but I didn't think it suited the query.

    I usually say something like:

    "Vaise meri Urdu koi khaas acchi nahin hai, balke kaafi kharaab hai"

    or

    "Mujhe kuch khaas to nahin aati, meri Urdu itni acchi nahin hai."

    or if I am feeling silly

    "Mai.n bas shahgird hoo.N"

    I wouldn't be lying either.

    What is the noun for a compliment anyway?
     

    The Boss Big Boss

    New Member
    "India - Hindi & English"
    ‘करत -करत अभ्यास के जड़मति होत सुजान।

    रसरी आवत-जात ते, सिल पर परत निसान।’

    Pronunciation In English:
    (Karat -Karat Abhyaas ke jadmati hot sujaan .
    Rasri aawat -jaat te, sil par padat nisaan .)

    Meaning:
    Karat :- Doing
    Karat -Karat :- Continuously Doing
    Abhyaas :- practice (Practicing)
    Te :- On
    Jadmati :- Fool (Lifeless)
    Hot :- Becomes
    Sujaan :- Intelligent (Wise)

    Rasri :- Rope
    Aawat :- coming
    jaat :- going
    Te :- On
    Sil :- Stone
    Par :- Over
    Nisaan :- Marks

    (By continuously practicing a fool can become wise/ intelligent
    Similar to the way...
    When we use rope to fetch water from well, the continuous motion of rope leaves a mark on stone)

    This can also be explained by an English Quote:

    “Dripping water hollows out stone, not through force but through persistence.”
     
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