Hindi: There aren't any bananas.

06vijhk

New Member
English - UK
Hi all,

Could you translate "there aren't any bananas." into Hindi please?

I would instinctively translate as "कोई केले नहीं (हैं)।" but I have read in textbooks that कोई, when used as an adjective, should only be used with singular nouns. I've also read that कुछ which can mean 'any', and be used with plural nouns, should not be used in negative statements like this.


Thank you!
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "कोई केले नहीं हैं।" is fine (without the brackets - the हैं is not optional). कुछ means "some," not "any."
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    "कोई केले नहीं हैं।" is fine (without the brackets - the हैं is not optional). कुछ means "some," not "any."


    Does that mean कुछ केले नहीं हैं is wrong? Or does it mean something different than 'there aren't any bananas'?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Note that the usual statement to mean "there aren't any bananas" is "koii kelaa nahiiN hai" (with the singular "kelaa").

    The plural "kele" can also be used (as in OP), but often, it is used to emphasise non-existence. If one doesn't want to emphasise that, usage of singular form is the norm.

    "koii kelaa nahiiN hai (yahaaN par)" - a banal statement saying there're no bananas here
    "koii kele nahiiN haiN (yahaaN par)" = "koii kele-vele nahiiN haiN!" - you said there were bananas here, but there aren't any bananas here!
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    @littlepond That is a really useful distinction to have pointed out, thank you. That escaped me entirely. Through interference in English, I would have continued to use plural kele in all such situations, had you not said otherwise.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Strictly speaking.....

    is vaqt baazar meN kelaa nahiiN hai.

    The singular is the "genus" and the statement is mentioning the fruit known as "kelaa" as opposed to "aam" etc.

    The plural form "kele" would be a count noun as, ek kelaa, do kele۔۔۔۔۔ or say, different varieties of the fruit known as "kelaa".

    I dare say, this distiction is not necessarily complied with.

    The OP's statement is somewhat incomplete.

    There aren't any bananas (here)

    Or: There is no banana (here)

    yahaaN (ko'ii) kela nahiiN hai.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I was perusing another thread regarding the translation of 'without wasting any time.' Interestingly one forero translated it with koi (baGhair koii vaqt barbaad kiye) and the other with kuchh (baGhair kuchh vaqt barbaad kiye). Any thoughts as to any semantic/idiomatic differences (if any) of koii vs kuchh here?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I was perusing another thread regarding the translation of 'without wasting any time.' Interestingly one forero translated it with koi (baGhair koii vaqt barbaad kiye) and the other with kuchh (baGhair kuchh vaqt barbaad kiye). Any thoughts as to any semantic/idiomatic differences (if any) of koii vs kuchh here?

    Both feel equivalent to me (maybe with "koii," it's a bit stronger?).
     
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