Hindi: to answer

Lika Brown

Senior Member
Armenian-Armenia
Dear friends, how to say:
"Why you are not answering"?
I know that to give an answer is "jawab dena".
Example 2: "Just answer the question please otherwise i will keep on asking"

Thanks,
 
  • luoruosi

    Member
    usa
    english - america
    you can also say "uttar denaa"
    So, I would say, "tum uttar/javaab kyo.n nahi.n de rahe?"
    "bas savaal se uttar do, varnah mai.n puuchh rahoo.n"
    "question" can also be "prashr"
     

    Lika Brown

    Senior Member
    Armenian-Armenia
    Dear Luoruosi, thank you for your translation!
    I can say just "de rahe?" No need for "de rahe ho?" :)
    And for the second example: I didnt know that puch rahoon means i will keep on..
    So for saying i will keep on doing it will be: "main kar rahoon?"
     

    Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "question" can also be "prashr"
    I assume this is just a typo? I know the word, 'prashn'.

    Dear Luoruosi, thank you for your translation!
    I can say just "de rahe?" No need for "de rahe ho?" :)
    And for the second example: I didnt know that puch rahoon means i will keep on..
    So for saying i will keep on doing it will be: "main kar rahoon?"
    In Luoruosi's sentence here:
    "tum uttar/javaab kyo.n nahi.n de rahe?"

    The 'ho' has been dropped because the verb has been negated with a 'nahin', in which case it's optional.

    In this sentence:
    "bas savaal se uttar do, varnah mai.n puuchh rahoo.n"

    This is a conditional sentence with the second clause in the subjunctive mood. It indicates a lack of certainty to use the subjunctive; one can certainly use the future indicative, too. If we were to take the same sentence and do just that, it would look like the following, and indicate greater certainty on the speaker's part:

    "bas savaal se uttar do, varna mai.n puchhta rahoonga"

    You could read more about that here.

    So the examples you've asked about, 'de rahe?', 'poochh rahoon?', and, 'main kar rahoon?, are all in the subjunctive, and outside of the two clause, conditional sentence structure, indicate more that you're asking for permission. So to translate each successively, you would get, "Shall/should we keep giving?", "Shall/should I keep asking?", and, "Shall/should I keep doing?". I hope that helps.
     

    luoruosi

    Member
    usa
    english - america
    Dear Luoruosi, thank you for your translation!
    I can say just "de rahe?" No need for "de rahe ho?" :)
    And for the second example: I didnt know that puch rahoon means i will keep on..
    So for saying i will keep on doing it will be: "main kar rahoon?"
    Yes, like Jashn explained, if you use nahi.n to negate the sentence, you don't need to add the word "hotaa" or any conjugation of the word.
    And, "rahnaa" actually means "to stay", which in Hindi, also shows something will continue being in a certain state. For example "mai.n tumse hameshaa pyaar kar rahoo.ngaa", which means "I will always love you". You don't say, "mai.n tumse hameshaa pyaar karoo.ngaa". Another useful phrase is "rahane do", which can be translated to "Forget it" - literally, "let it stay".
     

    Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    No, it's not a typo. I mean प्रश्र.
    Well, you learn something new every day. :) I've never heard 'prashr' before. It shows up in some google searches, but I can't find it in any dictionaries. Would you know if it's a regional/dialectal word? Perhaps based off of prashn? Thanks for the help.
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    There is no such word as प्रश्र (prashr). It is a misreading or misspelling. The correct word is प्रश्न (prashn).
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Based on the English sentence in the opening post (...answer the question...), shouldn't the Hindi translation be prashn ka uttar do - give an answer of the question instead of prashn se uttar do - give an answer from the question?
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindi
    For example "mai.n tumse hameshaa pyaar kar rahoo.ngaa", which means "I will always love you". You don't say, "mai.n tumse hameshaa pyaar karoo.ngaa".
    To my ear, this sounds exactly backwards. For "I will always love you," I would indeed say मैं तुमसे हमेशा प्यार करूँगा maiN tumse hameshaa pyaar karuuNgaa. The other sentence, using *कर रहूँगा *kar rahuuNgaa sounds decidedly ungrammatical to my ear.

    So the examples you've asked about, 'de rahe?', 'poochh rahoon?', and, 'main kar rahoon?, are all in the subjunctive, and outside of the two clause, conditional sentence structure, indicate more that you're asking for permission. So to translate each successively, you would get, "Shall/should we keep giving?", "Shall/should I keep asking?", and, "Shall/should I keep doing?".
    Similarly, both *पूछ रहूँ *puuchh rahuuN and *कर रहूँ *kar rahuuN sound ungrammatical to my ear. I think the progressive construction

    verb stem + रहा/रही/रहे rahaa/rahii/rahe + copula हूँ/है/हो/हैं/था/थी/थे/हूँगा/… huuN/hai/ho/haiN/thaa/thii/the/huuNgaa/....​

    has been grammaticalized and now, in this particular construction, the auxiliary रहना rahnaa doesn't admit it's full range of conjugations — it has to be in its perfect participle forms रहा/रही/रहे rahaa/rahii/rahe. The copula can still be conjugated into any of its conjugations though.

    There are ways of obtaining a progressive subjunctive. Just for the sake of examples, here are some sentences using grammatical constructions I think can be fairly called "progressive subjunctives" of various sorts.

    वह मुझे मिलने ज़रूर आएगी, चाहे वह जो भी कर रही हो
    woh mujhe milne zaruur aaegii, chaahe woh jo bhii kar rahii ho.
    She'll definitely come to meet me, no matter what she's doing.​

    क्या मैं बार-बार यही बात पूछता रहूँ?
    kyaa maiN baar-baar yahii baat puuchhtaa rahuuN?
    Should I keep on asking (you) this same thing over and over again?

    कभी-कभी मेरा मन होता है कि मैं बस दिन-भर अकेला बैठकर किताबें पढ़ता रहूँ
    kabhii-kabhii meraa man hotaa hai ki maiN bas din-bhar akelaa baiThkar kitaabeN paRhtaa rahuuN.
    Sometimes I want to just sit alone and read books all day long.

    मैं चाहता था कि मैं घोंटों उसकी आँखों में आँखें डालकर देखता जाऊँ
    maiN chaahtaa thaa ki maiN ghanTon uskii aaNkhoN meN aaNkheN Daalkar dekhtaa jaauuN.
    I wanted to look into his eyes for hours.
    But none of these progressive subjunctives seem particularly relevant for the example @Lika Brown asked about — it might just be lack of creativity on my part, but I can't think of a way I would use one of the various progressive subjunctive possibilities to translate the sentence:

    Just answer the question please otherwise i will keep on asking
    I like the translation by @Dib, using पूछता रहूँगा puuchhtaa rahuuNgaa. Some slightly more free-form translations could be something like the following.

    तुम सवाल का जवाब नहीं दोगे तो मैं बार-बार पूछता रहूँगा।
    tum savaal ka javaab nahiiN doge to maiN baar-baar puuchhtaa rahuuNgaa.
    If you don't answer the question, I'll keep on asking you over and over again.

    बताओगे नहीं तो मैं बार-बार पूछता रहूँगा।
    bataaoge nahiiN to maiN baar-baar puuchhtaa rahuuNgaa.
    If you don't tell me, I'll keep on asking you over and over again.

    बता दो, नहीं तो मैं बार-बार पूछता रहूँगा।
    bataa do, nahiiN to maiN baar-baar puuchhtaa rahuuNgaa.
    Tell me, or else I'll keep on asking you over and over again.​
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top