Hindi: to deserve

Lika Brown

Senior Member
Armenian-Armenia
Dear friends,
How does one say "to deserve" in Hindi?
Suppose, a friend loses his job and im saying to my boss: "He didnt deserve to lose his job"
Or i give a gift to someone and say: "You really deserve this"!
Thanks :)
 
  • aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    Just to get things going, one phrase that comes to mind is लायक होना laayak honaa which means something like "to deserve" or "to be worthy." For example,

    क्या यह किताब पढ़ने लायक है?
    kyaa yeh kitaab paRhne laayak hai?
    Is this book worth reading?

    वह हमारी दोस्ती के लायक ही नहीं है।
    woh hamaarii dostii ke laayak hii nahiiN hai.
    He's not worthy of our friendship / he doesn't deserve our friendship.
    You can also often use योग्य yogya in place of लायक laayak. But, in either case, these mostly get used when someone does or doesn't deserve something good, so you probably wouldn't use this for something like "he didn't deserve to lose his job." One option is to use चाहिए chaahie to say something like "he shouldn't have been fired." For example,

    उसको नौकरी से नहीं निकाला जाना चाहिए था।
    usko naukrii se nahiiN nikaalaa jaanaa chaahie thaa.
    or, in slightly more elevated language,

    उसको बर्खास्त नहीं किया जाना चाहिए था।
    usko barkhaast nahiiN kiyaa jaanaa chaahie thaa.
    Alternatively, you could do something like...

    उसको नौकरी से निकालना सही नहीं था।
    usko naukrii se nikaalnaa sahii nahiiN thaa.
    It wasn't right to fire him.​
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Extra information (just in case if it might be of interest): The Urdu words/pronunciations are laa'iq, barxaast, and saHiiH.

    Background:

    In Urdu, something like the following would probably be employed:

    • woh mulaazamat se bar-xaast kiye jaane kaa mustaHiqq nahiiN thaa.
    Questions:
    • Would the following sentence and usage of adhikaarii be appropriate in Hindi?
      • woh apne kaam/pad se (haTaa'e jaane/padachyut? kiye jaane) kaa adhikaarii nahiiN thaa.
    • What would be a formal term for firing, dismissing, etc. an employee or official?
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    Would the following sentence and usage of adhikaarii be appropriate in Hindi?
    • woh apne kaam/pad se (haTaa'e jaane/padachyut? kiye jaane) kaa adhikaarii nahiiN thaa.

    Like with लायक laayak/laa'ik and योग्य yogya, it seems to me like अधिकारी adhikaarii is probably usually used when the thing that is being deserved is something good. For example, राहुल सांकृत्यायन Raahul Saankrityaayan has the following (uncomfortably polemical) sentence to say towards the beginning of his घुमक्कड़-शास्त्र GhummakaR-shaastra

    चलना मनुष्य का धर्म है, जिसने इसे छोड़ा वह मनुष्य होने का अधिकारी नहीं है।
    chalnaa manushya ka dharm hai, jisne ise chhoRaa woh manushya hone ka adhikaarii nahiiN hai.
    Walking(/traveling) is a human being's dharma; (s)he who abandons it isn't entitled to be human.​

    It sounds a little unusual to me to use this word when the thing that is being deserved is something bad like being dismissed from one's office, but... I dunno. That could just be me.

    What would be a formal term for firing, dismissing, etc. an employee or official? Is पदच्युत करना appropriate and what is the exact pronunciation?

    In terms of frequency, it seems like we have

    बर्खास्त barkhaast/barxaast > अपदस्थ apadasth > पदच्युत padachyut,​

    though as far as I can tell, all of them are basically semantically interchangeable in any given sentence. Probably an IPA rendering of the third would be something like /pədət͡ʃ(j)ut/, with the glide j likely almost disappearing unless the speaker is articulating very clearly?

    Some possible fancy Sanskritic ways of saying "he didn't deserve to be fired" could be...

    उसकी पदच्युति उपयुक्त/उचित नहीं थी।
    uskii padachyuti upyukt/uchit nahiiN thii.​
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Thanks for the detailed reply! (The audio example/pronunciation was confusing, because it sounded like padach(h)it.)
     
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