Hindi: to skip

amiramir

Senior Member
English-USA
Hi all,

What's the most idiomatic way of saying 'to skip' as in 'children skipped down the street'? Many thanks.

(While we're at it, there's a thread here about the other meaning of 'skip' as in 'to miss,' which I'd also be interested in, but there were no Hindi-Urdu responses. )

Thank you.
 
  • swatshak

    New Member
    Hindi/Urdu
    Interesting question; and I hope my fellow native speakers can chime in!

    1) In 'children skipped down the street', 'to skip' would be best represented by फुदकना or उछल कूद करना. So your sentence would read बच्चे सडक पर उछल कूद करते हुऐ जा रहे थे।

    2) For the other most prominent use of 'to skip' ('to miss'), there isn't a literal translation in Hindi/Urdu, so IMO the most apt way of saying "I skipped X" would be to simply state "I didn't do X". For example, "I skipped breakfast today" would translate to मैंने आज नाश्ता नहीं किया

    Hope this helps!




     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Agree with @swatshak about both 1) and 2). For the sense 2), English words are also often used in the sentence by Hindi speakers (given that there is no ready "skip" or "bunk" of the 2nd sense in Hindi): for example, "maiN ne aaj klaas meN baNk maar diyaa" (I bunked a class today).

    Meanwhile, welcome @swatshak: the place needs some fresh voices!
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    उछल कूद for me is like jumping up and down (on the bed, for example). So for me your sentence would have been more like hopping down the street, rather than skipping. Is that a fair distinction? फुदकना is also very hopping-like, no?

    A child can skip happily, but a rabbit can only hop. Not sure how we make this distinction in Hindi. Or maybe we just don't, and it becomes clear with context?

    Thanks again
     

    swatshak

    New Member
    Hindi/Urdu
    Thank you @amiramir and @littlepond for the warm welcome.

    Regarding फुदकना, while it does correspond to 'to hop', the boundary between 'skip' and 'hop', even in English, is vaguely defined. Google gives the definition of 'skip' as 'move along lightly, stepping from one foot to the other with a hop or bounce'; therefore फुदकते हुए जाना is very close to the English definition. As you have rightly guessed, context does make it clearer though.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    By the way, it wouldn't be a natural expression in Hindi: people would rather say something like "khelte hue", rather than the very specific hopping and jumping. (There is no "skip" as such in Hindi; even skipping rope is "rassii kuudnaa".)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top