Hindi, Urdu: ऊंची दुकान फीके पकवान

Maharaj

Senior Member
Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
I was reviewing a sweets shop and this idiom is perfect to describe it.

ऊंची दुकान फीके पकवान

But I've to write review in English so is there an English equivalent ?
 
  • amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I have racked my brain to come up with an English equivalent, but I am not coming up with anything. Google suggests things like 'great cry little wool,' but it's a saying I have never heard of.

    I would suggesting dispensing with an idiom and just describing what you mean-- i.e. outward appearances promised a lot, but the foot underwhelms / disappoints / underdelivered.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Did you mean food?

    What is the literal meaning of Great cry little wool?
    Yes, sorry, that was a typo. I'd edit it, but then the thread wouldn't make sense.

    I'm assuming it refers to a sheep or lamp that makes lots of noise while getting sheared, but then only a bit of wool results.
     

    Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    This reminds me of the opposite of the marketing advice, "Under-promise, over-deliver". So it's more like, 'they over-promised, but under-delivered'.

    I'm also reminded of the proverb, 'Not all that glitters is gold'. e.g. "This shop, with all its promise, has proven true the old adage that not all that glitters is gold", or something like that.

    You could also say, they 'did not live up to expectations', that you were 'let down', the food was 'lackluster', etc.
     

    Maharaj

    Senior Member
    Bundeli, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi
    Actually the shop used to live up to its expectations and has earned its name by their top quality services but this is the thing of past now. Now only the name is there, no quality.
     

    Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    If you want a one-to-one proverb equivalent, it seems that is the best suggestion, @littlepond. I have to agree strongly with your comment that you must consider the audience, though. I'm a native English speaker who has family from England and Ireland, a Canadian who's well-exposed to American English, and I've never heard it in my life. In context, it's clear enough, but this is not a common expression even for native speakers.

    It's not a proverb, but after thinking about this a little more, I remembered that people usually say someone or something has 'come up short' or 'fallen short' when they have high expectations that were not met, which would be appropriate for a situation where the company has a good reputation but hasn't met expectations. It's not a proverb, but it is a natural and common way of expressing the idea. Good luck, @Maharaj. ;)
     
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