Hindi-Urdu: bhaanaa

amiramir

Senior Member
English-USA
Re: liking things: I get the sense (I could be wrong; am hardly an expert) that, unlike Gujarati, where we hear bhaave chhe & game chhe fairly often and where some things bhaave chhe but can't game chhe and vice versa, in Hindi-Urdu bhaanaa isn't as widely used (though still common). Are there categories of things where it is idiomatic to use bhaa jaanaa vs pasand aanaa/karnaa? Does it mean something else in H-U as opposed to Gujarati?

Thanks.
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    You are right, "bhaa jaanaa" is not that common in Hindi: it is used, though, now and then. It can be interchangeable with "pasand aanaa" in most situations. If it helps, "pasand aanaa" can be slightly stronger than "bhaa jaanaa": for example, let's say a marriage proposal for a boy had gone to a girl and her family. Later on, two women are gossiping about what happened. One woman says "arre, sab bohat baRhiyaa rahaa, laRkaa use ekdam bhaa gayaa." In this situation, "laRkaa use pasand aa gayaa" is a much stronger statement. On the other hand, maybe, this girl has been rejecting a lot of suitors, and now that a suitor is finally approved, the girl's mother is, imagine, calling the girl's younger sister not in town and telling her the good news, "are, laRkaa pasand aa gayaa us ko!" She is jubilant, and it's not something to be expected as normal after all those rejections, so she uses the stronger option.

    (In Gujarati, again, I believe, though I might be wrong, that "game chhe" is slightly stronger than "bhaave chhe." But, in Gujarati, both are common, as you rightly say.)

    Note that there is another meaning of "bhaanaa" - something or someone befitting someone - and in this sense it's quite common. For example, someone wearing a new sari. A group of women complimenting this woman: "are, yeh raNg to aap pe baRaa bhaa rahaa hai" -- one could substitute "bhaa" here with many other words, such as "fab" and "jach," with the same meaning.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Yes, though for many Hindi speakers, "ph" and "f" have become "f" (and that since a long time, not just a recent phenomenon).
    Thank you. I was aware of this but was n't sure whether you had written "fab" deliberately or if it was a typo. Would you say "bahaaro fuul barsaa'o meraa maHbuub aayaa hai"? Can you provide some sort of timeline when Hindi began to have a "ph" to "f" shift?
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    Can you provide some sort of timeline when Hindi began to have a "ph" to "f" shift?
    In Samuel Kellog’s “A Grammar of the Hindi Language” (1876), he said “to a great extent, the common people substitute the foreign sound of f for ph even in Indian words”. So it was already widespread at that time. I presume the less Persianate (and non Perso-Arabic script) sections of Indian society have been merging ph and f in either direction since the early days of Muslim rule.

    Anyway, thanks to @littlepond, I learned some usages of “bhaanaa” that I wasn’t familiar with.
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    In Samuel Kellog’s “A Grammar of the Hindi Language” (1876), he said “to a great extent, the common people substitute the foreign sound of f for ph even in Indian words”. So it was already widespread at that time. I presume the less Persianate (and non Perso-Arabic script) sections of Indian society have been merging ph and f in either direction since the early days of Muslim rule.

    Anyway, thanks to @littlepond, I learned some usages of “bhaanaa” that I wasn’t familiar with.
    Thank you @desi4life for the reference. It does seem odd that the same phenomenon did not arise amonst Urdu speakers.

    An example of usage of the verb "bhaanaa" from an old Indian film "Aan", in a song penned by Shakil Badayuni and sung by Muhammad Rafi. The songs opening line begins with the words..."MuHabbat chuume jin ke haath...".

    ruup-nagar se aa kar chandaa
    un kaa ruup churaa'e
    meraa man dekh dekh rah jaa'e
    bhalaa yih baat mujhe kyoN bhaa'e
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Would you say "bahaaro fuul barsaa'o meraa maHbuub aayaa hai"?
    Of course, why not! I myself say both "phuul" and "fuul," depending on how much attention I am paying that day! Hope there's no need to pursue this further, especially given that it's off-topic for this thread.
     
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