Hindi, Urdu: ... dekhaa ... dekhaa

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

The "dekhaa ... dekhaa ..." below, how can it be translated?

In lyrics websites they say "I tried to understand, I tried to appease/entertain it"
The whole idea is, that one's feelings can't be denied.

Would dekhaa be an adverb here (in sight of)? Or a noun (sight)? Or the participle of dekhaanaa (I saw)?
Is it a usual expression when one tries one thing after another?
If so, does it require what is tried (samjhaanaa, behlaanaa) to be in absolutive?


jitnii thii xushiyaamN sab kho chukii hai, bas ek Gam hai ki jaataa nahiiN
samjhaa ke dekhaa bahlaa ke dekhaa, dil hai kii chain is ko aataa nahiiN


Thanks in advance for any help.

[The verses belong to the famous Bollywood song and movie "Kabhi Alvida Na Kehna"]
 
  • aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    Any verb X in the absolutive(/conjunctive) plus dekhnaa forms a complex predicate meaning "to try to do X," and the dekhaa in the lyrics is the perfective participle of dekhnaa. The construction doesn't inherently carry a sense of "trying one thing after another" --- the lyrics carry this sense, but it's largely because of the parallel structure. For a non-reduplicated example... If someone is being fussy about eating something, you might say:

    खाके तो देख, शायद अच्छा लगे।​
    کھا کے تو دیکھ، شاید اچھا لگے۔​
    khaake to dekh, shaayad acchaa lage.
    Try (eating) it, you might like it.​
     
    Last edited:

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    I agree to aevynn's explanation of the grammar, but I think the exact sense is not quite "to try to do X", it is more like "to do X and then see what comes out of it". "To try to do X" has no implication whether the action X does eventually get performed or not. That depends on the result of the "try" part. Hindi "X kar ke dekh-" implies that the action "X" actually gets performed, and then comes the reckoning of the results.

    Let me give an example to explain what I mean. These days, India is (or at least it was till a week ago) under a strict lock-down with no public transport running. If someone wants to go to Agra from Gwalior, and you want to tell them, "Sure, try to go to Agra, but I don't think, you can", you won't say, *"Thiik hai, aagraa jaa ke dekh, lekin mujhe nahiiN lagtaa tuu jaa paaegaa", because you antecipate that the action in question (jaa-) cannot actually be performed. You can however say, "Thiik hai, aagraa jaane kii koshish kar (ke dekh), lekin mujhe nahiiN lagta tuu jaa paaegaa." Here, the "try" part is translated literally by "koshish karnaa", and because the action thus expressed (to try) can certainly be performed whatever the result, you can also add the "ke dekh" to it, if you wish.

    Caveat: I hope, I am not imposing the Bengali semantics of the parallel construction on Hindi. Please wait for confirmation.

    ---

    In many instances, English "to try something" (not "to try to do something") corresponds to a Hindi "... kar ke dekh-" construction, because English keeps the actual action verb implicit, which Hindi makes explicit, e.g.
    Try this food = ye chiiz/khaanaa khaa ke dekh
    Try this dress = ye kapRaa pahan ke dekh
    Try the metro (transport) = meTro se jaa ke dekh
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Now that I think about this, another song comes to mind, (with Braj elements): "Rang".
    It might be playing with the literal sense of "looking" in those sacred cities/directions, and "trying" them, (but never finding anything like the [color of the] master/lover).

    e, gokul dekhaa,
    mathuraa dekhaa
    puurab dekhaa,
    pashchim dekhaa,
    uttar dekhaa,
    dakkhin dekhaa,

    par tosaa na koii
    raNg dekhaa, rē!
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Now that I think about this, another song comes to mind, (with Braj elements): "Rang".
    It might be playing with the literal sense of "looking" in those sacred cities/directions, and "trying" them, (but never finding anything like the [color of the] master/lover).

    Yes, just like in the English phrase "have seen it all", the sense of experiencing is implied by "see".

    In the song again, the "see" is working as "experience".
     
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