Hindi,Urdu: dhaare

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Spanish
Friends,

In the following stanza, what does "dhaare" mean?

merii apnii maujeN haiN, mere apne dhaare haiN
aazaad baashiNdaa huuN, maiN apne rab kaa baNdaa huuN


This belongs to the theme track of the movie "Dabangg 3". It is basically the hero singing in first person, saying how he makes his own path in life.

In Hindi, it is always transliterated as धारे and transliterated as "currents or flows", which doesn't make sense to me.
First, because dhārā ( धारा / دھارا) is feminine, so I would expect something like dhaaraa'eN for a plural.
Second, "mere apne" should be "merii apnii" in that case.

Another acception of dhārā is a part of a law code, but the same problem remains, it is feminine.

It could also be that the whims (maujeN) are "flowing from" him, with the "from" elided?

Please orient me.
 
  • Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    aazaad baashiNdaa huuN, maiN apne rab kaa baNdaa huuN
    baashindah; rabb; bandah
    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    dhārā ( धारा / دھارا) is feminine
    dhaaraa can actually be both feminine and masculine (Feroz-ul-Lughat; Urdu Lughat: see literary examples).
    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    whims (maujeN)
    I have not heard the lyrics you have quoted so cannot comment on the meaning in the specific context, but please note that the primary meaning of موج | امواج is wave | waves.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I need to hear the song (again), because that is indeed odd if the singer is referring to "dhaar" (edge), which is feminine and so should be "merii apnii dhaareN", or "dhaaraa" (stream), which is also feminine and so should be "merii apnii dhaaraaeN". Alfaaz jii mentions that "dhaaraa" is both masculine and feminine: maybe, but to a Hindi ear, if that's what is meant, it would sound very odd. But then poetic license can always be used.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    A few relevant lyrical examples:

    اٹھلاتی یہ شوخ ہوائیں بہتی ندیا چنچل دھارے
    کھلتی کلیاں اڑتے بادل سچ مانو یہ سب ہیں تمہارے
    جیون بھر کے ہیں یہ سہارے پیار کرو تو ان سے کرو
    یہ موسم یہ مست نظارے پیار کرو تو ان سے کرو
    کرتے ہیں یہ تم کو اشارے پیار کرو تو ان سے کرو

    ب. ا. دیپ (بشیر احمد) از پاکستانی اردو فلم درشن ۱۹۶۷

    iThlaatii yeh shox hawaa'eN behtii nadiyaa chanchal dhaare
    khiltii kaliyaaN uRte baadal sach maano yeh sab haiN tumhaare
    jeevan-bhar ke haiN yeh saahaare pyaar karo to in se karo
    yeh mausam yeh mast naZaare pyaar karo to in se karo
    karte haiN yeh tumko ishaare pyar karo to in se karo

    B. A. Deep (Bashir Ahmad) az Pakistani Urdu Film Darshan (1967)


    تو گنگا کی موج میں جمنا کا دھارا

    شکیل بدایونی از بھارتی فلم بیجو باورا ۱۹۵۲

    tu gangaa kii mauj, maiN jamnaa kaa dhaaraa

    Shakeel Badayuni az Bhaartii Film Baiju Bawra (1952)


    کہنے کو جشن بہاراں ہے عشق یہ دیکھ کے حیراں ہے
    پھول سے خوشبو خفا خفا ہے گلشن میں
    چھپا ہے کوئی رنج فضاء کی چلمن میں
    سارے سہمے نظارے ہیں سوئے سوئے وقت کے دھارے ہیں

    جاوید اختر از بھارتی فلم جودھا اکبر ۲۰۰۸

    kahne ko jashn-e-bahaaraaN hai 3ishq yeh dekh ke HairaaN hai
    phool se xushbuu xafaa xafaa hai gulshan meN
    chhupaa hai ko'ii ranj fazaa2 kii chilman meN
    saare sahme naZaare haiN so'e so'e waqt ke dhaare haiN


    Javed Akhtar az Bhaaratii Film Jodhaa Akbar (2008)
     
    Last edited:

    bakshink

    Senior Member
    punjabi
    In Hindi, it is always transliterated as धारे and transliterated as "currents or flows", which doesn't make sense to me.
    First, because dhārā ( धारा / دھارا) is feminine, so I would expect something like dhaaraa'eN for a plural.
    Second, "mere apne" should be "merii apnii" in that case.
    I think it is the poetic license or freedom that he has enjoyed. If at all it has to be used as a plural, it should be धारें
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I think it is the poetic license or freedom that he has enjoyed. If at all it has to be used as a plural, it should be धारें
    But that would be the plural of feminine "dhaar". @Alfaaz jii has already given numerous examples of Hindi songs where "dhaar" is being used in the masculine, plus an Urdu dictionary is giving that gender as well.
     
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