Hindi/Urdu: excrement

tonyspeed

Senior Member
English & Creole - Jamaica
There seem to be at least have a dozen words for excrement aka faeces in Platts. Which are the common ones used? And is there a difference between them?
 
  • greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    You could list out the words here, maybe, tonyspeed, to understand which words you are talking about?

    Meanwhile, the words that are used for "feces" are usually "TaTTii", "laiTriin" (from the English word "latrine"), and "gobar" (for animals' feces). The word "shauch" is only used in the word "shauchalay" (the abode of excrement!, otherwise toilet). I think there is some word like "chhiinke" (not to be confused with sneezing, "chhiiNknaa") or something (I have never used it, so it escapes my memory) as well for feces.

    Do note that as in most languages of the world, this is a word that varies a lot depending on the region/people you are in/among, including colorful/onomatopoeic terms.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    There seem to be at least have a dozen words for excrement aka faeces in Platts. Which are the common ones used? And is there a difference between them?
    Well, TS SaaHib, I can tell you that the ones below are used by us:

    گُو guu (masc.) (has the variant: hagguu !) - most general meaning and therefore most common in our speech and preferred to TaTTii the usage of which we consider a bit rude! [ٹَٹّی TaTTii also has a different meaning of a screen made of reed or bamboo, etc.]
    گوبر gobar (masc.) - mostly for quadrupeds (cattle etc.)
    پاخانہ paa xaanah (also پائخانہ, often pronounced as pai-xaanah, the preferred choice for us, but the more vulgate and quite common pronunciation is pa-xaana). This has been discussed earlier. Used for both humans and animals.
    مینگنی meNgnii (fem.) = بیٹ biiT (fem.)(= droppings) [alternative is biiTh] - for goats, sheep, rodents, bats etc.
    لِید liid (fem.) - interestingly mostly for horses, donkeys, etc
    فُضلہ fuDhlah (masc.) [the Arabic original is faDhlah but in Urdu we don’t always stick to the original pronunciation] = refuse; offal; excreta; remainder - rarer and more general usage
    بول و براز baul o baraaz (masc.) or just baraaz, given that baul = urine - frequent usage in literary circles in place of the more common ones above, since baraaz (= shit) is considered more formal and so polite!
    اجابت (fem.) = bowel motion, motions, evacuation, stool, excrement - another polite usage! But other meanings too which have nothing to do with the topic.
     

    greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    ^ We use guu only for excreta of dogs, etc., and it is a highly vulgar word for us! As for biiT, we also use it for bird droppings (or, rather, for all tiny excreta kinds).

    A quite popular word for feces is also "chhi(i)-chhi(i)" - the usage has become much less than it was say twenty years ago, but still on the popular side, especially when it relates to young children.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    We use guu only for excreta of dogs, etc., and it is a highly vulgar word for us! As for biiT, we also use it for bird droppings (or, rather, for all tiny excreta kinds).
    In Urdu and Colloquial Hindi گو गू gū is and has been widely used to mean excrement of both humans and animals but there are other words as well as, mentioned above. Yes, one can use biiT for bird droppings too but we also us guu because it is a general term.

    H گو गू gū [for gūh; S. गूथं, rt. गू], s.f. Human excrement, ordure, dung, filth:—gū ućhālnā, lit. 'To throw up dung'; to sully (one's own) good name, to bring disgrace upon oneself:—gū-se

    गू gu: (nm) faeces; —का चोथ (चोंत) an ugly inert man; —मूत human excreta; —में घसीटना to subject (somebody) to grave humiliation and embarrassment; —में ढेला फेंकना to provoke a wily tongue.


    A quite popular word for feces is also "chhi(i)-chhi(i)" - the usage has become much less than it was say twenty years ago, but still on the popular side, especially when it relates to young children.
    We use chhii-chhii too for faeces when talking to children but it can also mean just any dirt or filth - more than one usage. chhii by itself is also used and can mean dirt, filth etc. or just used as an interjection to express disgust.

    H چهي छी ćhī, छि ćhi [Prk. छि; S. धिक्], intj. Fy! foh! faugh!ćhī-ćhī, s.f. Dirt, filth, excrement;—(colloq.) an epithet applied to a class of Eurasians (by whom the expression ćhī is commonly used);—intj. Fy! shame! &c. (see ćhī).

    چهي chhī H interj. Tush! tut! fy! foh!
     

    tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    GB-ji Here is the massive list you requested.

    S اميدهيه अमेध्य amedhya, adj. Impure;—s.m. Impure substance, impurity; fæces, excrement.
    A براز barāz, birāz, s.m. Satisfying a want of nature; stool, motion; excrement, human ordure;—coming out or forth to battle; fighting.
    H بشٿها बिष्ठा bishṭhā [S. विष्ठा], s.f. Ordure, excrement, filth, dirt.
    H بيٿهہ बीठ bīṭh [S. विष्टा, rt. विष्], s.f. Excrement, dung (especially of birds).
    S پريش पुरीष purīsh, s.m. Refuse, rubbish; the remains of food (left in a pot); fæces, excrement, ordure
    H پوت पोत pot [S. पूतिकः], s.m. Dung, ordure, excrement.
    P پيخال pīḵẖāl, vulg. paiḵẖāl, s.m. Excrement, dung (esp. of birds):—pīḵẖāl karnā, v.n. To dung; to mute.
    झाड़ा jhāṛā [rt. of jhāṛnā+ā = Prk. अओ=S. अ+कः], s.m. Sweeping, cleaning, clearing; minute search (made by making a person suspected of stealing take off all his clothes); sweepings; a stool, purge, evacuation; excrement, dirt, filth
    deh-ćyut, part. adj. Separated or detached from the body (as excrement, or the spirit)
    P سرگين sargīn (=S. सर्ग+इन्), s.m. Dung, excrement, cow-dung.
    S سمل समल sa-mal, adj. (f.-ā), Having dirt, dirty, foul, filthy, muddy; impure, polluted, sinful;—s.m. Excrement, feculent matter, ordure.
    H سندا सन्दा sandā (for P. sanda), s.m. An anvil (=sandān, q.v.); a broad stone; fetid excrement (=sanḍā, q.v.).
    H سنڐا सण्डा saṇḍā [prob. Prk.संडओ; S. षण्ड+कः], adj. (f.-ī), Big, fat, burly, stout, strong, sturdy;—s.m. A big or fat ox;—hardened excrement, scybala:
    A غائط g̠āʼit̤ (v.n. fr. غوط 'to sink; to become hidden,' &c.), s.m. Excrement, ordure.
    faẓla, vulg. fuẓla (for A. فضلة faẓlat, v.n. fr. فضل 'to exceed,' &c.; see faẓl), s.m. Remaining portion, remainder, residue; redundant portion, redundance, superfluity, exuberance; overgrowth;—leaving, refuse, orts; excrement; filth, dirt:
    S کٿ किट्ट kiṭṭa, vulg. kiṭṭ, s.m. Secretion; excretion; excrement; dirt, filth, impurity
    H گو गू [for gūh; S. गूथं, rt. गू], s.f. Human excrement, ordure, dung, filth:
    H هگ हग hag (fr. hagnā, q.v.), s.m. Evacuation, stool; excrement, fæces:
    S وشٿا विष्टा vishṭā, s.f. Ordure, fæces, excrement (cf. bīṭh or bīṭ).
    S وش विष vish, s.f. Fæces, ordure, excrement.
    H مل मल mal [S. मलं], s.m. Dirt, filth; dust; impurity; impure matter; excrement;mal-mūtr, s.m. Excrement and urine:
    H لينڐي लेंडी leṅḍī [S. लेण्ड+इका], s.f. Excrement, dung (of sheep, or goats, &c.); a lump or nodule of dung
    H لينڐ लेंड leṅḍ [S. लेण्डं, लण्डं], s.f. Excrement, filth; orbicular dung (as of camels, goats, &c.); a lump of hardened fæces or scybala (=leṅḍī).
    H گوبر गोबर gobar [prob. S. गो+वरः or वटः], s.m. Cow-dung (used for plastering floors, &c., and dried for fuel)
    H بتهيا बथिया bathiya, s.f. Heap of dried cow-dung.
    H برکلا बुरकला burkalā, burkulā, birkulā, s.m. A small cake of cow-dung with a hole in the middle
    H بڙهاون बढ़ावन baṛhāwan, s.m.=baṛhāʼo, q.v.;—s.f. Cake of cow-dung placed on the top of a heap of corn as a charm against the effects of an evil eye.
    H بن बन ban [S. वन], s.m.ban-kanḍā, s.m. Dried cow-dung found in forests
    P پاچك pāćak, s.m. Cowdung dried for fuel (syn. uplā):—pāćak-i-dashtī, s.m. Dry dung (of animals) found in fields and jungles (syn. kanḍe).
    H پانس पांसु pāṅsu, पांस pāṅs [S. पांसु], s.m. Dust; particle of dust; dung, manure; dunghill:
    P پشکل pishkil, s.m. The orbicular dung of sheep, goats, deer, &c. (=meṅgnī).
    H گوئينٿها गोईंठा goʼīṅṭhā, or गुईंठा guʼīṅṭhā, or गोयंठा goʼeṅt̤hā [S. गो+विष्ठा], s.m. Cow-dung (found in the fields or jungle), a dry cake of cow-dung (used as fuel).
    H گهورا घूरा ghūrā (i.q. kūṛā, q.v.), s.m. Sweepings, rubbish;—soil, manure;—a dust-heap, dung-hill;
    H ليد लीद līd [prob. Prk. लित्ता; S. लिप्ता, rt. लिप्; lit. 'what is smeared or plastered over'], s.f. Dung (of horses, mules, asses, and elephants):
    H مينگني मेंगनी meṅgnī, and miṅgnī [meṅg˚ = mīṅg or miṅg, prob. akin to S. मृज्, and मज्जा;+ = = Prk. अडिआ or अलिआ=S. अ+ल+इका], s.f. The orbi. cular dung of goats, sheep, deer, camels, rats, &c.
     

    HafizAliH

    New Member
    Urdu, Punjabi-Pakistan: American English
    Tonyspeed, that is quite a intimidating list you have there, but may I say that many words in that list are not used frequently for excrement. I did not read the entire list thoroughly, but the word "jhara" caught my attention. According to my knowledge (of "coloquial" urdu/punjabi, never learned it in a formal setting, although I spoke them almost exclusively at home) the word jhara (or jhaRa, perhaps may be what is intended) is the past tense of "jhaRna," meaning to shake off or brush off (filth or dirt of some sort). Just what I thought might be a beneficial clarification.

    Although I do agree with the other posters, the word is subjective to where/who it is spoken by, as almost everyone has different ways to say such words at a young age. I regards to "chhii," it was always used it to mean urine, and not excrement in my family.

    My two cents.
     

    greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    ^ Since jhaaRaa has come into discussion, the word, or rather its plural form, jhaaRe, is certainly used in my family but only when one has dast (dysentery) - that particular form of excrement with its "texture" and frequency! There is also the very common aaoN ban-naa, which happens again when one passes liquids instead of proper excrement (when one's peT is gaRbaR).

    That list is surely intimidating; "sanDaa" in that list reminds me of "sanDaas", a common word for toilet in Gujarati (and also in Hindi in certain regions). Never heard many of the words in that list.

    Welcome to the forum, btw, Hafiz!
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Well, TS SaaHib, I can tell you that the ones below are used by us:

    گُو guu (masc.) (has the variant: hagguu !) - most general meaning and therefore most common in our speech and preferred to TaTTii the usage of which we consider a bit rude! [ٹَٹّی TaTTii also has a different meaning of a screen made of reed or bamboo, etc.][...]
    nah puuchho kuchh GhariiboN ke makaaN kii
    zamiiN kaa farsh hai chhat aasmaaN kii
    nah paNkhaa hai nah TaTTii hai nah kamrah
    zaraa sii jhaunpaRii miHnat kaa samrah
    amiiroN ko mubaarak ho Havelii
    GhariiboN kaa bhii hai Allah belii

    Isma'il Merathi
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Well, TS SaaHib, I can tell you that the ones below are used by us:
    [...]
    بول و براز baul o baraaz (masc.) or just baraaz, given that baul = urine - frequent usage in literary circles in place of the more common ones above, since baraaz (= shit) is considered more formal and so polite![...]
    "davaa kii puRiyaa takiye ke niiche, joshaande kii degchii sarhaane rakhii hu'ii, chaar-paa'ii se milaa hu'aa baul-o-baraaz kaa bartan..."

    From "chaar-paa'ii" by Rasheed Ahmed Siddiqui (1896-1977)
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    "davaa kii puRiyaa takiye ke niiche, joshaande kii degchii sarhaane rakhii hu'ii, chaar-paa'ii se milaa hu'aa baul-o-baraaz kaa bartan..."

    From "chaar-paa'ii" by Rasheed Ahmed Siddiqui (1896-1977)
    It is quite understandable that Rasheed A. Siddiqui opted to use baul-o-baraaz instead of hag-muut ! The former sounds less offensive for obvious reasons. In some circles baul-o-baraaz would be far more common even in daily speech than the latter.
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Is the Punjabi alternative to biiT for bird droppings biT or wiT? I have to say I've heard both. In fact in Urdabi I've heard biT been used far more than beeT
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    According to the Punjabi dictionary on DSAL, the accepted terms in Punjabi are “viTTh” and “biTTh”.
    Based on this injunction, perhaps, I ought to be banished from the Punjabi speaking community for using an "unacceptable" term! :)
     
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