Hindi, Urdu: jaa ke xat[a]m

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

The following stanza belongs to "Vaaste", a generic love song:

tujhii se hotaa shuruu / yah meraa kaarvaaN
tujhii pe jaa ke xat[a]m / yah meraa saaraa jagat


the second verse is supposed to mean something typical of love songs, in the line of "This whole world of mine ... ends in you".
Or, more specifically, "is limited to just you".

I am a little confused about the grammar of the "jaa ke xat[a]m", I don't understand how it becomes "to be limited"

Is jaa a verb root for jaana, or the noun "jaa" meaning "place", as in, "place of termination"?
Is xat[a]m acting as a noun, or as an adjective, or as part of a verbal phrase like xat[a]m jaanaa (I know there is a xat[a]m honaa)?

Thanks in advance for any help.

[In the official Youtube video, "jaa ke xatam" happens at 3:57]
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "khatam/xatam honaa": to finish
    "jaanaa": to go
    "ke" here = "kar" (finished aspect)

    "jaa kar khatam [honaa]" - finished after having gone (at you only - tujh hii pe) [Note that it is "tujh hii": no "tujhii" exists.]

    I have never heard of a noun called "jaa"! (There is only a demonstrative pronoun "jaa".)

    UPDATE: An Urdu-speaking friend as well as @Alfaaz jii below, both have told me that "jaa" as a noun, meaning place, does exist in Urdu. Also, that the spelling "tujhii" does exist, so please accept my apologies.
     
    Last edited:

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    UPDATE: An Urdu-speaking friend as well as @Alfaaz jii below, both have told me that "jaa" as a noun, meaning place, does exist in Urdu.

    It might be uncommon in Hindi but “jaa” as a noun is part of Hindi usage too per dictionaries. Example from Oxford Hindi-English dictionary:

    जा jā [P. ], f. place. — ~ बजा [P. ba-], adv. here and there; everywhere. ~ बेजा, adv. in place and out of place: appropriate and inappropriate. – जा-नमाज़, जाय नमाज़, f. musl. prayer-mat, or cloth. बजा [P. ba-], adj. inv. in place: proper, fit; right, true.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    I have never heard of a noun called "jaa"! (There is only a demonstrative pronoun "jaa".)
    UPDATE: An Urdu-speaking friend as well as @Alfaaz jii below, both have told me that "jaa" as a noun, meaning place, does exist in Urdu. Also, that the spelling "tujhii" does exist, so please accept my apologies.
    It's not an everyday word though which would promptly come to mind of an Urdu speaker when asked to tell what the word for 'place' is. On reading the OP for the first time, I had this thought myself, hold a sec, a noun?! because I'd already read the title and understood the verbal sense of 'jaa'.

    In the thread which you'll find below there's some extra information about a hidden jaa in a word we use everyday ;) Urdu: jagah
    Actually both jaa and gaah come from Persian and both mean 'a place' etc, gaah as in Eidgaah you might be familiar with.
    jagah ''place-place'' is actually an amalgam of both words with the shortening of vowels.

    There's more to that, eg. in Marathi it's just जागा jaagaa and older Urdu had jaay-gaah.
     
    Last edited:
    Top