Hindi, Urdu: jagnaa vs. jaagnaa

Pokeflute

Senior Member
English - American
What's the difference between "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa"?

I know "jagaanaa" is transitive, but both "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa" seems to be intransitive. Are they interchangeable?

Also: I know "awake" as an adjective is "jagaa huaa" (e.g. "jage hue ho?" = "are you awake?"). Can "jaagaa huaa" also mean "awake"?

EDIT: changed "jaage huaa" to "jaagaa huaa" to fix a typo (see below)
 
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  • HindiMurkh

    Member
    Hindi & Gujarati
    What's the difference between "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa"?

    I know "jagaanaa" is transitive, but both "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa" seems to be intransitive. Are they interchangeable?

    Also: I know "awake" as an adjective is "jagaa huaa" (e.g. "jage hue ho?" = "are you awake?"). Can "jaage huaa" also mean "awake"?

    I'm just an ordinary Hindi speaker, but jaage huaa doesn't sound right conjugation wise.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "jaagaa huaa honaa" also exists.

    "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa" can mostly be synonymous and interchangeable, but "jaagnaa" implies a kind of mindfulness in the action.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    What's the difference between "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa"?

    I know "jagaanaa" is transitive, but both "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa" seems to be intransitive. Are they interchangeable?

    Also: I know "awake" as an adjective is "jagaa huaa" (e.g. "jage hue ho?" = "are you awake?"). Can "jaage huaa" also mean "awake"?
    There is no "jagnaa" in Urdu. The verbs in question are "jaagnaa" (intransitive) and "jagaanaa" (transitive).

    Sunil jaagaa hu'aa hai. Sunil is awake.
    Sadhna jaagii hu'II hai. Sadhna is awake.

    vuh donoN jaage hu'e haiN. They are both awake.

    Om Prakash ko jagaa'o. Wake Om Prakash up. (Awaken Om Prakash)

    "jaage hu'aa" is wrong.
     

    Pokeflute

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Sorry about that. "Jaage huaa" was a typo, I meant "Jaagaa huaa".

    Thanks for the replies. So I'm hearing that in Urdu there's just "jaagnaa" and "jagaanaa". In Hindi there's also "jagnaa, and the distinction is that "jaagnaa" is more intentional than "jagnaa".

    Would that be an accurate summary?
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Qureshpor said:
    There is no "jagnaa" in Urdu. The verbs in question are "jaagnaa" (intransitive) and "jagaanaa" (transitive).
    Could you please elaborate in light of the following entry and literary examples?
    جَگنا

    رک: جاگنا

    تاہم وہ بہر خیال موجود
    سونے جگنے کے حال موجود

    (۱۸۷۴، جامع المظاہر ،۵۰)

    اچھا تو اب جگیے اور ہوش میں آئیے۔

    (۱۹۵۸، ہمیں چراغ ہمیں پروانے ،۱۲۹)
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Could you please elaborate in light of the following entry and literary examples?
    Alfaaz SaaHib. I have to confess I had not heard of or read about "jagnaa" apart from "rat-jagaa" which I had assumed was a contraction of "raat-jaagaa". Thank you for proving me wrong.

    Have you come across usage of this word in your life experience?

    Going back to the OP's question and going by Platts...

    jagnaa to be awake/intransitive

    jaagnaa to be awake/ transitive

    The difference that I perceive in the two verbs and perhaps lost now is this. In the first one, one could be awake without making any effort or external influence on the sleeper's part whereas for jaagnaa there is that conscious effort. This is just my guess.

    jagnaa > jaagnaa > jagaanaa

    One could compare this with the following set.

    dikhnaa > dekhnaa > dikhaanaa

    Once again, in Urdu I have not come across the usage of the first verb, except perhaps by those following Hindi usage. In Urdu, dikhaa"ii denaa is the norm.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    jagnaa > jaagnaa > jagaanaa

    One could compare this with the following set.

    dikhnaa > dekhnaa > dikhaanaa

    That doesn't apply, for (in Hindi at least), this would be jagnaa ~ jaagnaa > ... > jagaanaa > jagvaanaa. "jagnaa" is not the passive form, as "dikhnaa" is, and "jaagnaa" doesn't necessarily imply intention.

    Note that all "jagnaa", "jaagnaa", "jagaanaa" (and if situation demands, "jagvaanaa") are used heavily in Hindi; I am surprised to hear that "jagnaa" is rare in Urdu.
     
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    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    ... the distinction is that "jaagnaa" is more intentional than "jagnaa".

    Often, they are used interchangeably, but sometimes, yes, "jaagnaa" conveys extra mindfulness or an effort. One must note that it is not that "jagnaa" is necessarily devoid of mindfulness, as the following example shows: "saari raat jagaa hai paRhaaii karte-karte, ab to so jaa, beTe!" The same sentence could be with "jaagaa" instead of "jagaa": it just notches up slightly the feeling of effort, the strenousness of remaining awake the whole night.
     
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    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Qureshpor said:
    Have you come across usage of this word in your life experience?
    Mostly in writing, poetry/lyrics, but sometimes in speech as well. However, I think I would agree that jagnaa appears to be less common than jaagnaa (which is more common in poetry and lyrics as well).

    Two additional examples of jagnaa:


    مجھے اونچی ہواؤں میں اڑنا ہے
    اور امبر کو جا چھونا ہے
    سونا ہے یار کے بستر پر
    پھر ہر خواہش میں جگنا ہے
    ...
    میرا چھوٹا سا اک سپنا ہے

    صابر ظفر - پاکستانی ڈرامہ میراۃ العروس
    mujhe uuNchii hawaa'oN meN uRnaa hai
    aur ambar ko jaa chuunaa hai
    sonaa hai yaar ke bistar par
    phir har xaahish meN jagnaa hai
    ...
    meraa choTaa saa ik sapnaa hai


    Sabir Zafar - Pakistani drama Meerat-ul-Uroos
    tujhe dekh dekh sonaa, tujhe dekh kar hai jagnaa

    Sayeed Quadri - Indian film Kalyug
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^ Yes, I am; the 'reduced' form is not something actually used but not for any reason of a possible subtle difference in meaning, instead rather because of the general accentuation. Frequently people read too much into the formal, theoretic and/or historic pattern for causatives but in practice many forms have fallen out of use while other forms (like, double causative for a single causative) have taken over.
    Which doesn't disagree with the fact of its presence in the dictionary.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Not used only in Urdu, probably.
    Yes, sure thing, that's what I was talking about. For what ever reason Urdu is there too in the thread title and what's more, some usage examples from Urdu literature came up, so I joined the discussion. By no means was my post concerned with Hindi.
     
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