Hindi-Urdu: Mora, Mohe, Maare

Hi Guys, I'm currently studying Hindi-Urdu (Hindustani) and I'm having a little trouble understanding why these words are used.


1). Mora/More: As in the songs ("Mora Piya" - Raajneeti) or ("Piya More" - Baadshaaho) -- Is this equivalent to Mera/Mere?

2). Mohe: As in the songs ("Mohe Rang Do Laal" - Bajirao Mastani) or ("Kaahe Chhed Mohe" - Devdas 2002) -- Is this equivalent to mujhe/mujhko?

^ For those two, I would like to know the origins of them. Are they from old Hindi, old Urdu? I just think knowing the origin would help me understand better why they are used instead of their equivalents of today.

3). Maare/Maari: This one is the most confusing to me because I know it can mean "killed". But I'm talking about the way it's used in the song ("Gup Chup" - Karan Arjun).
I'm talking specifically about the line that says, "mujhko Raanaa-ji maaf karna, galti maare se ho gayee" --> I don't know how it would mean "killed" in this sentence.

And in this song ("Tune Maari Entriyaan" - Gunday). --> What is the meaning of maari in "tune maari entriyaan re dil mein baji ghantiyaan re"?

And lastly in this song ("Dil Dance Maare" - Tashan) --> What is the meaning of maare in "dil dance maare re"?

Thank you!
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    And in this song ("Tune Maari Entriyaan" - Gunday). --> What is the meaning of maari in "tune maari entriyaan re dil mein baji ghantiyaan re"?

    And lastly in this song ("Dil Dance Maare" - Tashan) --> What is the meaning of maare in "dil dance maare re"?

    Thank you!

    Here, "maarnaa" means in the sense of "beat" (as in beating drums, etc.). For example, "taalii maarnaa" is clapping hands. "entry maarnaa" means a dashing entry; again, "dance maarnaa" here means like the heart started to dance rather energetically. See here.
     
    Thank you so much guys! @Maharaj , @desi4life , @littlepond

    That all makes sense, I think i'm also having a lot of trouble understanding the compound verbs.
    As @littlepond mentioned, "maarnaa" is like verb part of the entire compound so "dance maarnaa" means to dance rather energetically.

    Then if "maarnaa" as by itsself means to kill, what about "maar daalnaa" or anything that has "daalnaa" attached to it? I think I just need a more in depth understanding of compound verbs.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    ^ Some compound verbs are discussed here, here, here and here.

    If you want to keep discussing compound verbs, you need to open a new thread, as this thread was originally not about this.
     

    ShadowKing

    New Member
    Hindustani & English
    Hi Guys, I'm currently studying Hindi-Urdu (Hindustani) and I'm having a little trouble understanding why these words are used.


    1). Mora/More: As in the songs ("Mora Piya" - Raajneeti) or ("Piya More" - Baadshaaho) -- Is this equivalent to Mera/Mere?

    2). Mohe: As in the songs ("Mohe Rang Do Laal" - Bajirao Mastani) or ("Kaahe Chhed Mohe" - Devdas 2002) -- Is this equivalent to mujhe/mujhko?

    ^ For those two, I would like to know the origins of them. Are they from old Hindi, old Urdu? I just think knowing the origin would help me understand better why they are used instead of their equivalents of today.

    3). Maare/Maari: This one is the most confusing to me because I know it can mean "killed". But I'm talking about the way it's used in the song ("Gup Chup" - Karan Arjun).
    I'm talking specifically about the line that says, "mujhko Raanaa-ji maaf karna, galti maare se ho gayee" --> I don't know how it would mean "killed" in this sentence.

    And in this song ("Tune Maari Entriyaan" - Gunday). --> What is the meaning of maari in "tune maari entriyaan re dil mein baji ghantiyaan re"?

    And lastly in this song ("Dil Dance Maare" - Tashan) --> What is the meaning of maare in "dil dance maare re"?

    Thank you!

    Hi, as someone who is currently studying Caribbean Hindustani, I am familiar with some of the words you are curious about.

    1) Mora/more/mori, as well as other forms derived from "mor", I do not know if these are what is considered "Old Urdu/Hindi" but they certainly do originate from their older Awadhi/Purbi/Bhojpuri/Brij usage (in the Indian Subcontinent and abroad, in the Caribbean, Mauritius, South Africa and Fiji - these dialects are close to the Sarnami and Fiji-Hindi) and these are equivalent to Standard Modern Urdu/Hindi mera/mere/meri. The second person is thus tohar/tohre/tohri analogous to tera/tere/teri and in colloquial usage, tor. Example: " تور بھلا کام سے تور خراب کام نہ مٹ جائ۔" tor bhala kaam se tor kharaab kaam nah mitt jaai (your good deed does not erase your bad deed).

    2) Yes, mohe, again from the above mentioned usage, is the equivalent of mujhe/mujhko. Again, these are taken from various dialects/languages native to Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, and which have flourished in places as far away as Fiji, Suriname, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, South Africa and Mauritius, and even Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan. The older Awadhi dialect just happens to be my ancestral language, although the Standard Urdu of Delhi and Karachi is perhaps my mother tongue.

    Regarding the usage you are familiar with - the Bollywood titles you listed, the Mumbai film industry uses sometimes regional dialects for a variety of reasons. Perhaps to appeal to a wider audience, or maybe for the sake of poetry, as these dialects are considered to be, at times, rustic, authentic or "sweet" depending on what is desired.

    3) Maare, as you have spelled it, is derived from Rajasthani? dialect "mhaare" which is the same as Standard Urdu/Hindi mera. So in the song, "ghalti mhaare se ho gayee" in ordinary Hindi would be "Ghalti mere se ho gayee". It is not to be confused with Standard Urdu/Hindi verb maarna - to hit.

    The "maari entriyaan" and "dance maare" is indeed the same as verb maarna - to hit/kill. It derives from colloquial usage. "Entry maare" would be to enter, perhaps in a bold fashion and "dance maare" would simply be to do a dance. I think this usage may be influenced by Punjabi.

    I hope this satisfies you

    Thanks
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    3) Maare, as you have spelled it, is derived from Rajasthani? dialect "mhaare" which is the same as Standard Urdu/Hindi mera. So in the song, "ghalti mhaare se ho gayee" in ordinary Hindi would be "Ghalti mere se ho gayee".

    Hi! Welcome to the forum!

    Although some people do say "mere se", the grammatically correct form is "mujh se", so your sentence would be "Ghalti mujh se ho gayee". I guess "mujh" and "mere" are both covered by "mhaare" in Rajasthani dialects.
     

    ShadowKing

    New Member
    Hindustani & English
    Hi! Welcome to the forum!

    Although some people do say "mere se", the grammatically correct form is "mujh se", so your sentence would be "Ghalti mujh se ho gayee". I guess "mujh" and "mere" are both covered by "mhaare" in Rajasthani dialects.

    Thank you

    I agree the grammatically correct form in Standard Urdu-Hindi is "mujh se" (pronounced "mo-se" in the dialects I am studying).
    "Mere se", along with "mere ko", "tere ko", etc. are used in the street language of Mumbai and Karachi - and perhaps they originate from Dakhini/Hyderabadi Urdu?
    While I don't have a detailed knowledge of Rajasthani, I do enjoy hearing the dialect being spoken. It does appear to be the case that "mhaare" and "thaare" serve the same function as Standard Urdu-Hindi "mera/tera", but I am not sure if they cover "mujh/tujh".

    Regards
     
    Hi, as someone who is currently studying Caribbean Hindustani, I am familiar with some of the words you are curious about.

    1) Mora/more/mori, as well as other forms derived from "mor", I do not know if these are what is considered "Old Urdu/Hindi" but they certainly do originate from their older Awadhi/Purbi/Bhojpuri/Brij usage (in the Indian Subcontinent and abroad, in the Caribbean, Mauritius, South Africa and Fiji - these dialects are close to the Sarnami and Fiji-Hindi) and these are equivalent to Standard Modern Urdu/Hindi mera/mere/meri. The second person is thus tohar/tohre/tohri analogous to tera/tere/teri and in colloquial usage, tor. Example: " تور بھلا کام سے تور خراب کام نہ مٹ جائ۔" tor bhala kaam se tor kharaab kaam nah mitt jaai (your good deed does not erase your bad deed).

    @ShadowKing Thank you for your response! It's so interesting to know that you're studying Caribbean Hindustani because I'm actually Indo-Trinidadian and I know nothing about my ancestral language. In fact, the language is so lost today that we usually just end up speaking Hindi/Urdu, especially since there are so many resources that can provide us with knowledge for those instead of Caribbean Hindustani. I'm glad that there still people who can spread the knowledge.

    All the responses for this thread definitely cleared up my confusion about More, Mohe & Mhaare.
     

    ShadowKing

    New Member
    Hindustani & English
    @ShadowKing Thank you for your response! It's so interesting to know that you're studying Caribbean Hindustani because I'm actually Indo-Trinidadian and I know nothing about my ancestral language. In fact, the language is so lost today that we usually just end up speaking Hindi/Urdu, especially since there are so many resources that can provide us with knowledge for those instead of Caribbean Hindustani. I'm glad that there still people who can spread the knowledge.

    All the responses for this thread definitely cleared up my confusion about More, Mohe & Mhaare.

    You're welcome. When I first discovered Chutney music (I'm a huge fan - one of my hobbies is listening to various songs and then writing down the lyrics, or what I can make of them anyway haha), initially, I thought Trinidadians and Guyanese people spoke fluent Hindi, just as the Fijians do, but after research and meeting people from the region, I am convinced that the Caribbean Hindustani only survives today in Suriname (and the Netherlands) and thus it has been significantly influenced by Dutch and Sraran Tongo, sometimes making it unintelligible to people who speak only English and Standard Hindi but I do get to learn a new Dutch word here and there, eg. they call homework "huiswerk" and most of the material available is also written in a Dutch-based orthography.
     
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