Hindi, Urdu: participles for "inherent" qualities

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends:

One of the answers given in this thread caught my attention. It deals with past participles used adjectivally.
Essentially, it is said that adjectival participles denote "a process underwent" by the noun.

But I noticed that there is a large usage in English (and in Spanish, for that matter), in which participles are used in the sense of a present and/or inherent quality of the noun:

- an educated man (as in well-mannered, not paRhaa-likhaa)
- a collected man
- a dejected individual
- a reserved person

Would it be licit in H/U to use a perfective participle to characterize these situations?
(Not necessarily for these precise 4 participles, of course, but in general)
Does H/U have this usage of the perfect participle as a "present and general characterization", rather than a "process underwent"?
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    - an educated man (as in well-mannered, not paRhaa-likhaa)
    - a collected man
    - a dejected individual
    - a reserved person

    Would it be licit in H/U to use a perfective participle to characterize these situations?

    Does H/U have this usage of the perfect participle as a "present and general characterization", rather than a "process underwent"?

    No.

    Though I would say that your example 3 is not of the same category: a dejected individual is someone who has gone through dejection at something.

    To stretch the point, one could see how even examples 2 and 4 come about: a man who has been able to collect his senses, a person who has reserved their opinions or any self-expression to themselves. The "process" is still there.

    Example 1 is simply an idiom.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    - an educated man (as in well-mannered, not paRhaa-likhaa)

    I found this interesting. Your English is -- as evidenced by your writings on this forum-- impeccable. Not to go off topic, but just to point out I can't think of a situation in English where educated would mean well-mannered without connoting some form of schooling. It will always have the meaning of 'having studied'-- with that may come manners. But educated ≠ educado. Educated = formado, sometimes tiene estudios. Not that this has anything to do with the question posed.
     
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