Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi and others: jay maataa dii

marrish

Senior Member
اُردو Urdu
Hi,

In India it is often exclaimed by people ' jay maataa dii '. Some still say ' jay maataa jii'.

My friend said he was going to worship God by performing a 'puujaa' to the Goddess, he was not sure if he was going to do it alone or with his family.

He said 'maataajii kii puujaa karuuN gaa"


What does 'dii' mean?
 
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  • mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    "jai maataa dii" is Punjabi for "jai maataa kii". Punjabi "dii" = Hindi "kii".
     
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    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    Based on circumstantial evidence, it might actually be from Dogri (i.e. if you distinguish it from Punjabi). I believe, this phrase became popular in North India through the pilgrimage to Mata Vaishno Devi (maataa vaishNo devii) in Katra, Jammu - the chief Shakta (shaakta) pilgrimage site in Northern India.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Based on circumstantial evidence, it might actually be from Dogri (i.e. if you distinguish it from Punjabi). I believe, this phrase became popular in North India through the pilgrimage to Mata Vaishno Devi (maataa vaishNo devii) in Katra, Jammu - the chief Shakta (shaakta) pilgrimage site in Northern India.

    I have always understood it to be PahaRi and/or Dogri, too. I made the trek up to mātā vaishNo devī mandir and "jay mātā dī" was essentially every other phrase heard!
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    Standard Punjabi and Dogri are both prominent in Jammu, so the phrase could be from either one, assuming Dogri has "dii" as a post-position.
     
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