Hindi, Urdu: qaayda(h)

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MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

Is qaayda(h): rule, regulation, custom, precept masculine in Hindi and feminine un Urdu?

A Practical Hindi-English Dictionary
Urdu Lughat

What would be the plural in either register?
Aside from the Hindi dictionaries, there are lot of appearances for कायदे on the internet, some कायदें, and no "क़ायदाएँ" at all.


The word in Arabic is قِيَادَة, which seems to be feminine, and, more in line with the Urdu lughat meaning, denoting more "marching orders, military command, leadership" rather than "rules" in general.
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    قايدة . And yes, it is feminine.
    I have a feeling there is some confusion over the word whose meaning and gender is being sought. In Urdu, I am not aware of the existence of قایدہ / قايدة.

    قیادت "leadership" in Urdu is indeed feminine, whilst قاعدہ, a masculine word that could mean "rule, custom" amongst many other meanings. قاعدہ does not exist in Hindi. The plural of this word would be قاعدے in Urdu.
     
    Last edited:

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Ah, OK.
    I drew an inexistent relationship between words

    It seems the right correspondence is:

    Urdu: قاعِدَہ
    Hindi: क़ायदा (the ع with zer being resolved into a य)
     
    Last edited:

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    The word in Arabic is قِيَادَة, which seems to be feminine...
    By the way, the original Arabic noun is indeed feminine (as are most Arabic nouns ending in -ة). My understanding is that, the gender of Arabic nouns gets neutralized in Persian since Persian doesn't have grammatical gender (and hasn't had it for a long time), which means that by the time the word got to the Subcontinent, Hindi-Urdu speakers were free to assign whichever gender "sounds correct" --- and since Hindi-Urdu speakers would perceive قاعدہ ending in an [a:], it makes some sense that this would be treated masculine. This is a fairly common pattern with other Arabic feminine nouns ending in -ة (eg, feminine Arabic مقدمة yielding masculine Hindi-Urdu muqadma).
     
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