Hindi, Urdu: rahegaa hoke hii

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MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

What on earth does "rahegaa hoke hii" mean, both in general, or in the stanza below?

honaa hai / jo honaa hai rahegaa hoke hii
hotaa hai / jo mil jaataa hai koii
hogaa yah hai jaanaa maiN ne mil ke tum se hii
[Are you feeling it tonight?]
[I am feeling it tonight]


It belongs to the chorus of the 2014 Indian action movie (and song of the same name) "Bang, Bang!", which as the name indicates, should not be overly complicated. But those are too many "honaa" together for me :)

My attempt:
It must happen / Whatever must happen, will just keep happening
It happens / when someone is met ...


But shouldn't have been "rahegaa honaa" then?
Why hoke?
"... will continue to have happened?"
I am not sure that makes sense even in English.

Please orient me.
Thanks in advance.
 
  • Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I wonder if it isn't the word order that's confusing?

    jo hona hai / hoke hi / rahega

    What has to happen / only having happened / will remain
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "(verb) ke (hii) raihnaa" - it has to happen.

    A commonly used phrasing. For example, "exam meN yeh savaal aa ke rahegaa" - this question has to come in the exams (the speaker is sure about it). Another example: "ab voh us se mil jo liyaa, pyaar to ho ke hii rahegaa" - now that he/she has met him/her, love has to bloom (between them)".

    For a past inevitability, one uses "honaa hii thaa". There's a popular song of some years back, called "pyaar to honaa hii thaa".
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    @littlepond's explanation certainly results in a more idiomatic English translation, but, FWIW, I also like @Jashn's explanation of why this grammatical construction has the idiomatic meaning that it does (V-ke hii rahegaa → will only remain/stay/stop/... after having V-ed → has to V).

    PS. Incidentally, the jo honaa hai part of the line seems like another example of what I called construction (III) in this post! :)
     
    Last edited:

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I don't think the sense of "remain" can be taken for "rahega" in "(verb) ke rahegaa" constructions.

    "voh yahaaN aa ke hii rahegaa" ~ "voh yahaaN aa ke hii dam maaregaa" : In this, to parse it as "he, only having come here, will remain" would be a wrong meaning. The sentence means, rather, "he has to come here", with "has to" in the sense of "he has determined to come here", i.e., his coming here is now unstoppable.

    The "(verb) ke rahegaa" construction implies unstoppability (as perceived by the speaker, of course). (The "has to" does not imply obligation.)
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    I don't disagree with anything you've said :) There probably isn't a good, idiomatic English translation that literally uses the word "remain." I just thought that words like "remain" and "stay" and "stop" are all pretty similar in meaning, and it felt to me that, by thinking about the construction V-ke (hii) rahnaa in the way that Jashn broke it down, one might still be able to understand *roughly* what the construction means.
     
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