Hindi/Urdu: TaRka and Baghaar

lcfatima

Senior Member
English USA
As far as I know, the cooking technique of tempering is called taRka (lagaana) in some places and baghaar (lagaana) in other places in the Hindi/Urdu speaking regions. It seems to me that baghaar is used more in Urdu (at least Pakistani Urdu and for Hyderabaadi Indian Urdu speakers), and taRka in Hindi, but I am not sure if my observation is correct. They both appear to be Indic words.

Also, taRkaari is used sometimes, I am not sure if this is now the adjective for taRka or just another way to say taRka.

Can I have more information about these words, where is each term used?
 
  • panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Never heard <baghaar> in my life. Tell me, is that an aspirated gh or a ghain?

    In my house, we use <taRkaa>, which is also synonymous for the wee early morning hours.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Actually, for 'baghaar' we use the verb 'denaa' - بگھار دینا - or simply 'baghaarnaa' ( بگھارنا ). Used by native Urdu speakers from both India and Pakistan. Is 'lagaanaa' more of a Punjabi trend? I've seen 'taRkaa' (as in taRka daal) in menus of Indo-Pak restaurants in the UK - mostly run by Bangladeshis!! So I wonder if it is Bengali. In Urdu-Hindi common idiom, 'taRkaa' also has another meaning = early dawn! For example, ‘taRke uT-hnaa’ (تڑكے اٹھنا ) = subH savere uT-hnaa (صُبح سویرے اٹھنا) = to rise very early. Incidentally, ‘baghaarnaa’ is also used in a completely different sense. If someone is showing off, then we also use this verb as: woh bahut shookhee baghaar raha hai = he is really showing off / flaunting. [ shookhee jhaaRnaa ( شوخی جھاڑنا ) is also used.] ABout 'taRkaari' I have no idea. Never used it. But 'tarkaari' as you know is 'vegetables'.
     

    lcfatima

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Maybe I just invented baghaar lagana based on the fact that one says taRka lagana. I will have to ask.

    I didn't know tarkaari meant vegetables, either. I thought tarkaari might mean something to which taRka had been added. But it isn't even a retroflex R on tarkaari?
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    No, tarkaari = تركاری . No rertroflex R here. I just confirmed that in Punjabi it is indeed 'taRkaa lagaanaa' = bag-haar denaa'.
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    In our home we say bag-haarna e.g. daal tay-yaar hay, bas bag-haarnay ki kasar hay. I guess in the rest of the country they rather use taRka, since all the cooking shows feature the word.

    NaheeN aapa tarkaari has nothing to do with taRka. It means sabzi but I've never heard it outside of our household.

    Are you sure what you call tempering is bag-haarna and not dam dayna (we don't call it that, something along the lines of seejna or something else)?
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    We do. It IS an aspirated g/گ. I write these broken by a hyphen to distinguish گھ from غ and کھ from خ etc.
     

    lcfatima

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Dam dena is when you cover something tightly to let it finish cooking, and cook it on low heat. Like when you finish cooking the biriani rice which was previously par boiled after you have layered it with the gravy. Or when you slow cook something with the lid on for a long time to tenderize the meat. Edit: removed information about dhungar.

    Baghaarna (a new verb for me!) is when you fry spices in oil to release their flavor, then either add in other ingredients, or pour the oil and spices into something else. It is sometimes done at the beginning of cooking, sometimes at the end, sometimes both depending on what the dish is.

    You know, I will ask a few more people about baghaar lagaana because sometimes I get wrong answers from regular non-instructor and non-linguist or non-lingophile folk, which is why I pose questions here.
     
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    Lugubert

    Senior Member
    This might be the environment for asking what I've tried for years to understand.

    In Rudyard Kipling's Kim, the dish tarkeean is very significant in one chapter. It seems to be a curry thing. I've danced around tarkaari and taRka, but never pinned down any exact correspondence. Ideas?
     

    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    USA
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    My mother uses both these verbs.

    taRka lagana and Bagarna (just a g) is the way she says it.

    tarkaari means vegetables but I haven't seen it being used a lot.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    tarkaaree = vegetables (uncooked or cooked); bhujia = vegetables cooked in a certain way - usually fried but can also be steamed and fried mix.
     
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