Hindi-Urdu: to stay up late

amiramir

Senior Member
English-USA
Hi again,

This came up yesterday and I didn't know how to say it. The sentences were:

  • Between the two of them, who likes to stay up late? (i.e. not go to bed on time)
  • Neither of them likes to stay up late.
Der tak rahna seemed ridiculous, but I couldn't think of another way.

Thank you for your help.
 
  • Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    By Urdu/Hindi you usually mean colloquial so in that vein "raat-der uThe rehnaa" or "der der tak uthe/jaage rehnaa." You could potentially say taa der shab (also shab-der) or der shab (shab-der) tak (can omit the tak in this case) jaage rehnaa.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Thanks, Sheikha saahib. I should know the answer to this already, but does uthe/jaage agree with the subject or is it always uthe/jaage? i.e. if a women, kya vo raat der tak uthii/jaagi rehti hai?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    • Between the two of them, who likes to stay up late? (i.e. not go to bed on time)
    • Neither of them likes to stay up late.
    Der tak rahna seemed ridiculous, but I couldn't think of another way.

    "der tak jagnaa, ~ jage raihnaa"

    "Un donoN meN se, kaun zaada/adhik der tak jagnaa pasand kartaa hai?/" ... kise der tak jagnaa pasand hai?"
    "Un meN se kisi ko bhi der tak jagnaa pasand nahiN hai"
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    By Urdu/Hindi you usually mean colloquial so in that vein "raat-der uThe rehnaa" ...

    That construction would be wrong. One could say "der raat tak uThnaa" instead: though, for me, that is more of a one-off or irregular occurrence (like for an exam): for habitual thing, I would use "jagnaa", not "uThnaa".
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Urdu:

    to stay up late - der tak jaagnaa; der tak jaagte rehnaa; taa-der bedaar rehnaa

    شب بیداری کرنا - shab bedaarii karnaa - to stay up at night

    Note: Just in case readers might be interested, the correct Urdu word is زیادہ - ziyaadah.
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    zaadaa or jaadaa only occur in hyper-fast speech. The typical pronunciations in Hindi are zyaadaa or jyaadaa, the former being the correct form.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Thank you all, for your input. I'm a bit confused because Sheikhsaahib and Alfaazsaahib use jaagnaa but lpji uses jagnaa. Which is correct? Or is it a Hindi-Urdu difference?
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Thanks. Jaagnaa and jagaanaa I am familiar with. But shabdkosh informs me jagnaa also exists, so just wanted to check.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I'm a bit confused because Sheikhsaahib and Alfaazsaahib use jaagnaa but lpji uses jagnaa. Which is correct? Or is it a Hindi-Urdu difference?

    Both "jagnaa" and "jaagnaa" are ok in colloquial speech: "jaagnaa" would be correct in standard language. "jagnaa" means "to wake up" correctly speaking, whereas "jaagnaa" means "to remain awake".
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    By the way, interestingly, when it comes to causative, "jagnaa" for "jaagnaa" becomes even more popular in colloquial speech: in the sense of "jagnaa" - "us kumbhkarNR ko jagvaane ke liye bhii to koii chaahiye!"; in the sense of "jaagnaa" but still using "jagvaanaa": "poorii raat bekaar meN hii jagvaayaa hai is kambakht ne" (also "poorii raat bekaar meN hii jagaaye rakhaa").

    I don't know if "jaagvaanaa" as a causative exists or not, but I have never heard it. It may be the grammarians' standard though.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    [Urdu] In addition to AZ SaaHib's der tak jaagnaa. der se sonaa. der se sone jaanaa.
    *jagnaa doesn't exist in Standard Urdu. jaagnaa->jagaanaa->jagwaanaa.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Yes, if we look this way then I can say that in Urdu jaagnaa is for "to wake up" as in jaag jaanaa as well as for "to stay up" - jaagnaa, jaagte rahnaa. The crude verb means to be awake it seems, doesn't it?
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    Here is what Bahri's Hindi dictionary says about "jagnaa".

    जगना jag·nā vi (a) to wake up, to be awake: वह जग गई है she has woken up. [= जागना which is more common]. (b) to kindle: दीये जग उठे lamps kindled up. [= जलना which is more common]. [vt जगाना, n. जाग]

    Transliteration:
    jagnaa vi (a) to wake up, to be awake: vah jag ga'ii hai - she has woken up. [= jaagnaa which is more common]. (b) to kindle: diiye jag uThe - lamps kindled up. [= jalnaa which is more common]. [vt jagaanaa, n. jaag]
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Both raat der & raat der tak jaage rehnaa are used in URDU (personal preferences aside). My question for Urdu speakers though is that besides shab be-daarii as Alfaaz saaHib has neatly pointed out what constructs could we use which substitute raat with shab? In Urdu we tend to use raat and shab interchangeably as in raat 8 baje becomes shab 8 baje so essentially raat-der (late night) I assume would become shab-der instead of der-shab.

    In relation to post 16:
    Jaage rehnaa is also used in favour of jaagte rehnaa in fact more often.
     
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