Hindi, Urdu: Vo chogaa pahane hai

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Pokeflute

Member
English - American
I was reading Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (hairii pauTar aur paaras patthar) and I came across the following line:

उसे शर्म नहीं आती कि वह चोगा पहने है
use sharam nahiN aati ki vo chogaa pahane hai

I thought that when wearing a piece of clothing, "pahanaa (huaa)" agrees with the subject. So stuff like "laRkaa chogaa pahanaa hai" and "laRkiyaaN choge pahani haiN. But in the above sentence "pahane" (plural) disagrees with "hai" (singular). Is this a typo or am I missing something?
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    No, there is no typo and you are missing something! :)

    Verbs such as "to wear" (pahananaa) behave somewhat differently compared with other verbs.

    The boy is wearing (now putting on) a trousers. laRkaa patluun pahan rahaa hai.
    The girl is wearing (now putting on) a saarii. laRkii saarii pahan rahii hai.

    The boy is wearing (has already put on/is dressed in) a trousers. laRkaa patluun pahne (hu'e) hai.
    The girl is wearing (has already put on/is dressed in) a saarii. laRkii saarii pahane (hu'e) hai.

    pahane hu'e is the declined past participle and it does not change to pahnii for the female.

    You may find these thread of use to you.

    Urdu: وہ اچھا کپڑا پہن رہا تھا

    Urdu-Hindi: paRe paRe vs paRii paRii
     
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    Pokeflute

    Member
    English - American
    Ah interesting. So it's always an adverbial participle (which is formally always -e, but informally for some speakers -e/-i depending on gender).

    Thanks both of you!
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Yes; "laRkii ne saaRii paihnii hai/paihan rakhii hai" would be standard.
    I asked the question because in Punjabi the "ne" in your colloquial Hindi sentence, would also be missed. So, Hindi also misses the "ne". Interesting.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    ^ Ah, that's indeed interesting! I doubt though if the Hindi colloquial version is the same sentence without the "ne". Because, the standard sentence "laRke ne patluun paihanii / paihan rakhii hai" does not reduce further. In fact, the colloquial sentence "laRkaa patluun paihnaa hai" does exist.
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Just to confirm. You are saying "laRkii saaRii pahnii hai" without "ne" exists in colloquial Hindi?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Just to confirm. You are saying "laRkii saaRii pahnii hai" without "ne" exists in colloquial Hindi?
    Yes. As is "laRkaa patluun paihnaa hai". I do not find them odd, as well: rather than the completive aspect of "paihne hue hai", "paihnaa" is more dynamic - whatever the grammarians might say. "laRkii ne saaRii paihnii hai" is very different for me than "laRkii saaRii paihnii hai".
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I asked more or less the same question here.

    In that thread, the verb agreed in gender and number with the object of clothing, when one has already worn an article of clothing. Granted, it wasn't a hotly debated thread, so not fully fleshed out.

    As such for me it would have been:

    laRkii ne saaRii pahanii (huii) hai (as lpji says above)

    I don't quite understand what the difference is between the above and laRkii saaRi pahane (hue) hai. Or are they interchangeable?

    Thanks.

    Edit: corrected typo
     
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    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    laRkii ne saaRii pahanii (huii) hai (as lpji says above)

    I don't quite understand what the difference is between the above and laRkii saaRi pahane (huee) hai. Or are they interchangeable?
    One could use them interchangeably (without making "huii" optional)* though for a native ear, there are nuances that each of them carries as separate from the other. The first focuses a lot on the sari (unless the tone really dictates attention on the girl), whereas the second is more matter-of-fact.

    * If you omit "huii", it means something different; then, it means "the girl has worn (a) sari" rather than "the girl is in a sari" (which all "laRkii ne saaRii paihanii huii hai/laRkii ne saaRii paihan rakhii hai/laRkii saaRii paihne hai" mean).
     
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