Hiroshima No Pika

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LVRBC

Senior Member
English-US, standard and medical
What is the literal translation of these words, please? It is, as I am sure you already realize, the title of a book by Toshi Maruki.
Thank you.
 
  • MKwhale

    Member
    Japanese
    Pika is written ピカッ in Japanese, an onomatopoeia (mimetic word) to describe a flash of light, and pronounced [pIka'] the last a sounds with strong expiratory air (an aspirate used in Chinese and/or Arabian).
    When the A-bomb was used over Hiroshima, the first thing people in Hiroshima felt was a flash of light too bright to believe that it was a natural phenomenon, then comes the heat, then the roaring sound with huge blast. Therefore the A-bomb is a ピカッ for those who actually lived there.
    'don', appeared in 'pikadon' introduced by Contrafibularity, is an onomatopoeia for the sound; and represents the bomb as a light followed by a sound.

    P.S.
    Although ピカッ is pronounced [pIka'] as an onomatopoeia, most of the victims in Hiroshima call the bomb ピカ [pi'kə] suppressively. By doing so, I guess, they avoid to visualize the disaster too much and suppress the grudge against their tragedy caused by both of our governments.
     
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    Allegromoderato2

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Pika is written ピカッ in Japanese, an onomatopoeia (mimetic word) to describe a flash of light, and pronounced [pIka'] the last a sounds with strong expiratory air (an aspirate used in Chinese and/or Arabian).
    When the A-bomb was used over Hiroshima, the first thing people in Hiroshima felt was a flash of light too bright to believe that it was a natural phenomenon, then comes the heat, then the roaring sound with huge blast. Therefore the A-bomb is a ピカッ for those who actually lived there.
    'don', appeared in 'pikadon' introduced by Contrafibularity, is an onomatopoeia for the sound; and represents the bomb as a light followed by a sound.

    P.S.
    Although ピカッ is pronounced [pIka'] as an onomatopoeia, most of the victims in Hiroshima call the bomb ピカ [pi'kə] suppressively. By doing so, I guess, they avoid to visualize the disaster too much and suppress the grudge against their tragedy caused by both of our governments.
    Thanks
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    P.S.
    Although ピカッ is pronounced [pIka'] as an onomatopoeia, most of the victims in Hiroshima call the bomb ピカ [pi'kə] suppressively. By doing so, I guess, they avoid to visualize the disaster too much and suppress the grudge against their tragedy caused by both of our governments.
    You need not resort to literary interpretation to account for the prevalence of ピカ. The codal consonant in ピカッ is glottal stop, and it's not amenable to consonants other than T. Most of the postpositions, therefore, cannot come after ピカッ. The only instances possible are ピカッと and ピカッて.

    Phonological process at work here can be illustrated as (C is for a consonant other than T):
    1. ʔt > tt
    2. ʔC > C

    The pattern 2 is presumably the force behind ピカ as a noun.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    t
    Pika is written ピカッ in Japanese, an onomatopoeia (mimetic word) to describe a flash of light, and pronounced [pIka'] the last a sounds with strong expiratory air (an aspirate used in Chinese and/or Arabian).
    When the A-bomb was used over Hiroshima, the first thing people in Hiroshima felt was a flash of light too bright to believe that it was a natural phenomenon, then comes the heat, then the roaring sound with huge blast. Therefore the A-bomb is a ピカッ for those who actually lived there.
    'don', appeared in 'pikadon' introduced by Contrafibularity, is an onomatopoeia for the sound; and represents the bomb as a light followed by a sound.

    P.S.
    Although ピカッ is pronounced [pIka'] as an onomatopoeia, most of the victims in Hiroshima call the bomb ピカ [pi'kə] suppressively. By doing so, I guess, they avoid to visualize the disaster too much and suppress the grudge against their tragedy caused by both of our governments.
    Thank you very much indeed.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    You have touched, graysesame, upon the phonetic values of the pesky ちっちゃいツ. あったかい is the result of haplology (or half-baked one) of あたたかい. There is no motivation to generate a glottal stop here. I'd transcribe it as [ʔattakai]. Inside a word, ちっちゃいツ is a double consonant. It is glottal stop only at the end of a word, as in えっ, or おっ.

    But you might be aware of the 'Net slang using ちっちゃいツ. I am talking about "cutification" by inserting them in bisyllabic words such as ネッコ (< ネコ) and パッパ (< パパ). The forgoing are simple double consonants but there are others unaccounted for by doubled consonants:
    マッマ (< ママ)
    イッヌ (< イヌ)

    Doubled nasal consonants exist in Japanese but they are canonically represented by ン. The cutified ママ would be マンマ, but it is not the case. Ditto インヌ. Is マッマ just an alteration at the level of grapheme on par with わたしゎ for わたしは? or does it indicate a glottal stop in the middle of a word? I don't have a definite answer.
     
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