his armour rung

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yuechu

Senior Member
Canada, English
Hello,

I am reading Tennyson's "The Lady of Shalott" and came across the following line:

"And from his blazoned baldric slung
A mighty silver bugle hung,
And as he rode his armour rung,
Beside remote Shalott."
http://www.online-literature.com/donne/720/

I find it hard to imagine armour ringing... (I suppose I associate it with a bell), nor is there any indication of it being struck or hit by anything else. Does this "rung" mean that his armour is making a sound?

Thanks!
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Does this "rung" mean that his armour is making a sound?
    Yes, I think it does. It could be that the mighty silver bugle repetitively struck his armour as he rode his horse, causing the armour to ring out like a bell.
     
    Last edited:

    yuechu

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Ah, yes... I think it must be the bugle striking his armour, you are right. I had dismissed this at first since it didn't sound like a very positive portrayal of Lancelot, having a constant banging noise when walking, but I suppose it must sound pretty in this case if it is ringing like a bell. Or perhaps it was purposely there as a "bear bell" (as bears were still around at that time in England).

    Thanks for the confirmation, Beryl!
     

    yuechu

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Oh, sorry gramman, I hadn't seen your reply when I sent the previous message. Thanks for your reply as well!
     

    gramman

    Senior Member
    Hi again

    No need to apologize. The action in this forum moves at a very rapid pace. :cool: I imagine the sound of armour in those days could be just as reassuring or frightening as it is now — depends on whose it is. Tigers and bears, oh my! :eek:
     
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