His brain felt like a wrung sponge

BiT4000

Senior Member
Russian - Russia
Harry was relieved to hear the lunch bell. His brain felt like a wrung sponge.

Does "feel like a wrung sponge" mean "exhausted"? And can I feel like a wrung sponge and not my brain?
 
  • pickarooney

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    I would say it would be fine to describe yourself or your body as a wrung sponge, meaning that you have expended every last drop of energy (or confidence, hope, patience...)
     

    BiT4000

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    I would say it would be fine to describe yourself or your body as a wrung sponge, meaning that you have expended every last drop of energy (or confidence, hope, patience...)
    Thanks, but could you give me several examples?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    One drawback with this expression is that a wrung sponge is at its most absorbent. It may be exhausted but it is primed, and almost eager, to soak up lots of fresh stuff. Which probably isn't true of the person who uses the expression. :D
     

    pickarooney

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Interesting point, although for me a wrung sponge is when it's being held in that tightly-squeezed position rather than when it's released to take on its original shape.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Yes -- otherwise a wrung sponge and an unused sponge refer to the same thing. ;)
    Not necessarily ;). It's like the difference between an empty glass that you have just bought and an emptied glass that you have just drunk from.

    The sponge (brain) that was full of liquid (knowledge) has been squeezed dry (it retains its normal shape, but it's empty of content - or feels that way).
     
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