<his> breakfast

Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
An Indian student gets up early in the morning, goes for a walk, after returning from the walk, takes his breakfast. After his breakfast, he goes to school at 8 am.


Is the use of "his" correct here? It sounds odd to me. I think no possessive should be used here.


Thanks!
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    An Indian student gets up early in the morning, goes for a walk, and after returning from the walk, takes his breakfast. After breakfast, he leaves for school at 8 am.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The his is superfluous in both cases. And I would have said it’s even more unidiomatic in “takes his breakfast” (who takes breakfast anyway, except maybe in a hotel?) than in “after his breakfast”.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Takes" is generally not used for food (at least in modern AmE). "eats his breakfast" is fine though "eats breakfast" is better.
    As Chasint subtly points out, you have a comma splice in your original sentence.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    The his is superfluous in both cases. And I would have said it’s even more unidiomatic in “takes his breakfast” (who takes breakfast anyway, except maybe in a hotel?) than in “after his breakfast”.
    Would it be idiomatic if I leave out "his" from both places, i.e.
    ...eats breakfast
    ...after breakfast
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    An Indian student gets up early in the morning, goes for a walk, and after returning from the walk, has breakfast. After breakfast, he leaves for school at 8 am sounds more idiomatic to me.

    Or better still:

    An Indian student gets up early in the morning and goes for a walk. He has breakfast after returning from the walk. At 8am he leaves for school.
     
    Last edited:

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Yes. But you do need to add an and before the third thing he does, as has been said.
    Thanks. May I ask one more question please: what's the real reason for adding "his" there in both places, though, as you've just confirmed that the sentence is idiomatic without it?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    My mother had supper then went to bed.

    Here, there’s no need to say that it was her supper as this is obvious. The addition of a possessive pronoun would not be incorrect but it would be redundant, just as in the text that you provided. There is no “real reason” for adding one.

    But of course it’s possible to fabricate scenarios in which some kind of possessive would be necessary. For example:

    • My brother ate my father’s meal because he had phoned to say he was eating out with a client.
    • My sister was so furious with her husband that she threw his dinner in the bin.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "He comes back and has his breakfast" sounds more personal and chatty to me. An anxious mum might ask, "Have you had your breakfast?"

    "After breakfast, he..." (because it would be excessive to use "his" twice).
     
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