His case has <outlasted> a district attorney

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Justice Delayed: 10 Years in Jail, but Still Awaiting Trial

Quotation: DOTHAN, Ala. — Kharon Davis was 22 when he was charged with capital murder and booked into the county jail. Ten years later, he is still there, awaiting trial.

He has had two judges, four teams of lawyers and nine trial dates, the first of which was in 2008. His case has outlasted a district attorney who served for nearly three decades. It defies any common understanding of the right to a speedy trial.
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Hi everyone! How should I understand "outlast" here?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Quite. It's not well put. But it just means the case has lasted longer than the DA's term of service. He's retired since the case began but it's still grinding on.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But it says the DA served three decades, while the case's been lasting for only one decade. So it doesn't mean what it grammatically should. That's why it's not well put, right?
    Yes, I didn't put that very well, did I! :D

    What I should have said was that the case has gone on for so long that the original DA has now retired. To that extent, the case has outlasted him.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    What I should have said was that the case has gone on for so long that the original DA has now retired. To that extent, the case has outlasted him.
    We really don't know whether the district attorney "retired." DAs are elected in the U.S.

    It's safer to say "left office."
     
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