His face was buried to the nose in a muffler

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Allegromoderato2

Senior Member
Portuguese
Found the following phrase in a Yasunari Kawabata's book, Country Snow.
Context: it's cold and snowing. A station master is going to attend to a girl's call on a train.

"The station master walked slowly over the snow, a lantern in his hand. His face was buried to the nose in a muffler, and the flaps of his cap were turned down over his ears."

What does that whole bold part mean?
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Muffler can be two (completely disparate) things.

    muf·fler
    ˈməf(ə)lər/
    noun
    1. 1.
      a scarf or wrap worn around the neck and face for warmth.
    2. 2.
      NORTH AMERICAN
      a part of a motor vehicle's exhaust system, serving to muffle the sound of the vehicle.
     

    Allegromoderato2

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Ok.
    That phrase would be more intelligible if written as: His face was buried up to the nose with a muffler.

    Why "in a muffler" and why just "to" but not "up to"?:confused:
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    His face was buried to the nose in a muffler, - His face was covered as far as his nose in/by/with a scarf,
     
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