His father is disgusted(A)/against him for his (B)/addiction to drink.

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Pawan phoenix

Member
"Hindi - India"
In the following questions, one part of the sentence may have an error. Find out which part of the sentence has an error and click the button corresponding to it. If the sentence is free from error, click the "No error" option.

His father is disgusted(A)/against him for his (B)/addiction to drink.(C)/No error(D)
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    We are not allowed to answer test questions for you. You need to tell us your own answer, and explain it, so that we can comment on that.
     

    Pawan phoenix

    Member
    "Hindi - India"
    We are not allowed to answer test questions for you. You need to tell us your own answer, and explain it, so that we can comment on that.
    Sir I think this question has dual errors in option B and C as well ..there should be "with" instead of "against" in option B and in option C there should be "drinking" instead of "drink"..
    Am I right?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    there should be "with" instead of "against" in option B
    :thumbsup:
    The second part is not particularly idiomatic but
    drink (noun, uncountable) = alcoholic drinks in general
    drinking = the action of drinking [alcoholic drinks in general].

    I would say C, "drink", is correct: you are addicted to a substance (drink), not the action of taking that substance.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    :thumbsup:
    The second part is not particularly idiomatic but
    drink (noun, uncountable) = alcoholic drinks in general
    drinking = the action of drinking [alcoholic drinks in general].

    I would say C, "drink", is correct: you are addicted to a substance (drink), not the action of taking that substance.
    I would note that there is a distinction in usage between American English and British English. In American English we would replace "drink" with "alcohol". We would never say, "drink driving", we would say "driving under the influence of alcohol".

    We would say, "he is addicted to alcohol" or more likely, "he is an alcoholic".
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In BE, we would say "he is an alcoholic".

    The example, judging by this and others the OP has posted, comes from an Indian government test/exam - It appears to have been set in 1843 and never updated.:)
     
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