His fingers twisted her

Julieonline

Senior Member
chinese
<Question has been given its own thread by moderator (Florentia52)>

A Game of Thrones,
Chapter 3,
a scene with Daenerys (the Dragon Mother) and Viserys (her older brother),
Here, Viserys is informing Daenerys that she is going to meet her future husband

"Let them see that you have a woman's shape now." His fingers brushed lightly over her budding breasts and tightened on a nipple. "<...> You don't want to wake the dragon, do you?" His fingers twisted her, the pinch cruelly hard through the tough fabric of her tunic. <-----Excess quote removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

In, "his fingers twisted her," what does "her" refer to? Her fingers, her nipple?
While I was reading, I was expecting there to be a noun after "her," since there wasn't, my best guess was that the noun was omitted to reduce redundancy, which means "her" is actually "her fingers." However, the context of the story seemed to be saying that Viserys' fingers were twisting Daenerys' nipple. I am confused.




 
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  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Her", grammatically, refers vaguely to her body. It's up to you to figure out the specific body part was her nipple, because that's the part he was holding.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's as kentix says.

    In addition, if it meant that he twisted her fingers, it would read "his fingers twisted hers". (Also, her fingers aren't likely to be underneath the fabric of her tunic.)
     

    Julieonline

    Senior Member
    chinese
    "Her", grammatically, refers vaguely to her body. It's up to you to figure out the specific body part was her nipple, because that's the part he was holding.
    Thank you very much for your help!
    Would you say that this is a "style of writing," where the author is being deliberately vague so that the reader can enjoy figuring out things on their own?
     

    Julieonline

    Senior Member
    chinese
    It's as kentix says.

    In addition, if it meant that he twisted her fingers, it would read "his fingers twisted hers". (Also, her fingers aren't likely to be underneath the fabric of her tunic.)

    Thank you very much!
    Right, if it meant "her fingers," it would be "hers" not "her".
    I was so confused. Not anymore, thanks a lot :)
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "He twisted her" is of the same form as "He punched her" or "He pushed her" etc. However from the context we can guess where the twisting took place on her body.
     

    Julieonline

    Senior Member
    chinese
    "He twisted her" is of the same form as "He punched her" or "He pushed her" etc. However from the context we can guess where the twisting took place on her body.
    Thank you for the examples! While I was reading, somehow my mind was convinced that there has to be a noun after "her."
    Seeing the examples you mentioned above really helped my mind let go that compulsion :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I admit that " he twisted her" is rather odd. I guess the writer thought a repetition of "nipple" would have been too clumsy (and it would).
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    :D It was perceptive of you.

    I agree with kentix that it sounds "creepier". The man is her brother, and he's asserting his control over her.
     

    Julieonline

    Senior Member
    chinese
    :D It was perceptive of you.

    I agree with kentix that it sounds "creepier". The man is her brother, and he's asserting his control over her.
    Somehow it sounds creepier, too.
    Hi, when you say "creepier," do you mean it is similar to deliberate obscurity in horror movies, in which monsters are often shown in dim light, leaving something to the viewer's imagination and consequently making the monsters more scary than they really are?
    If the author writes "his fingers twisted her nipple," sure, we will probably all agree that the brother is a creep, it is very obvious. However, when we read "his fingers twisted her" we may need a moment to realize what is really happening. That process of not exactly sure what is going on, trying figuring things out, and eventually finding out the truth gives more emotional impact. Is that what you mean by saying "creepier"?
     
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