his impassive face still mocking her

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Alex Coseff

Senior Member
Czech
Hello,

I understand both the meanings - that of "an impassive face" (expressing no emotions) as well as that of "mocking" (ridiculing/making someone look small...). I´m a bit confused, though. I´m not quite sure how an impassive face mocking someone looks like.. At first sight, I´d reckon that impassive and mocking are mutually exclusive...I´d appreciate your comment/paraphrase of the phrase. Thank you.

Victoria Jenkins: The girls in the water
She closed her eyes in an effort to block the sight of him. He was still there when she opened them, his impassive face still mocking her.
She heard herself choking. She could feel herself drowning.

Background info:
She is looking at her kidnapper who is going to throw her into the water... alive...



 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    At first sight, I´d reckon that impassive and mocking are mutually exclusive
    You need to use your imagination - that sentence should work in Czech as well as English:

    his face, which in a normal person would have shown some concern or sympathy for her predicament, was impassive. It was clear that this lack of sympathy was his way of mocking her feeble struggling and fear.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Maybe the fact that he shows no emotion is mocking her because she is in a dire situation of his making. Lets face it, this distinction would be the least of your worries if you ever find yourself in her predicament.

    Edit: x-posted in complete agreement with Paul.
     

    Alex Coseff

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Yes, perhaps I should use my imagination:)
    "Mocking" is therefore just let´s say "reading between lines" here. I guess I can visualize his face now:)
    Thank you PaulQ and Suzi br:)
     
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