His palm looked like an egg that the rooster had got to.

< Previous | Next >

doxister

New Member
Italian
<< His palm looked like an egg that the rooster had got to. >>

Hi community,
which is the image that convey this expression?
A rooster about to eat an egg? A rooster who's broken the egg?
Is it grammatical correct the relative "that" in this clause?
This is from "Sea Animal", a short story by Tom Spanbauer. A great writer with a peculiar syntax sometimes :)
Thank you so much.
Andrea
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    WHAT "baby", Myridon? There's no context here at all; we can't tell whose palm.

    In answer to the question: To me, without further text, it would seem to resemble an eggshell that had been pecked at roughly—i.e., the palm appeared cracked, with many lines in it.
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Well.... it is true that more context is needed. Myridon just google searched as I did. It is available as a free, online book.
    The context won't really add much in the way of help for us sadly.

    But you are correct Parla; the OP does need to provide the context in his/her post.
     

    doxister

    New Member
    Italian
    You're right guys, the context! Sorry!
    That's the palm of a baby who has a disease and cannot open his hands.
    The image of a palm coverd with sores, that's sure.
    "his palm looked like a terrible blossom to me, like an egg that the rooster had got to"
     

    Wilma_Sweden

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Scania)
    << His palm looked like an egg that the rooster had got to. >>

    Is it grammatical correct the relative "that" in this clause?
    Yes, it's a restrictive relative clause. In fact, I don't see any alternative possibilities here, but some native speakers may disagree.

    Don't know about the rooster - they sometimes accidentally trample the eggs to bits, in which case they will probably eat those eggs...
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So the "egg that the rooster had got to" is an egg "fertilized" by this rooster?
    When we crack an egg into a pan, we still call the result "an egg" as in "I had an egg for breakfast." If the egg is fertilized, what falls into your pan will, in addition to egg white and yolk, contain something ranging from a spot of blood to a pinkish/purplish embryo to an almost fully developed chick. I'm thinking that the pinkish/purplish embryo might be about the size and appearance of the baby's fist.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top