His purine is high

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I wonder if it's natural to use the bold:

His purine is high.

I know that people don't use medical terms in their daily lives, but when it becomes too common, they do!

I went to a dinner with my cousin, someone asked why my cousin didn't eat seafood.

Thanks a lot
 
  • You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Foods that are high in purines can increase the level of uric acid in your body. I would say, He's on a purine-restricted diet because the levels of uric acid in his body are too high.

    Edit:

    Purines (specific chemical compounds found in some foods) are broken down into uric acid. A diet rich in purines from certain sources can raise uric acid levels in the body, which sometimes leads to gout. Meat and seafood may increase your risk of gout. Dairy products may lower your risk.

    Diet and Gout: Purines in Food - What to Eat and What to Avoid
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think I would say "levels" his purine levels are high. Not that I have ever had cause to use this word.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    His purine is high.
    This is OK if the listeners know that excessive levels of purine are related to attacks of gout. If this is not the case, the speaker (you) should be prepared to explain the significance of "high purine".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think I would say "levels" his purine levels are high. Not that I have ever had cause to use this word.
    I agree about using levels in this sort of phrase, but it does seem that it's the uric acid levels that are too high, not the purines, from Ripper's information.
    "My platelet levels are too low" To say "My platelets are too low" makes no sense because we aren't describing the platelets themselves, just how few there are of them, the quantity. On the other hand, one could say "My red blood cells are too big, the doctor says," talking about mishapen cells in lay terms.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There is a chemical called purine and there is a class of chemicals called purines. According to Wikipedia, "Purine (1) itself, has not been found in nature, but it can be produced by organic synthesis." The class includes caffeine (the stimulant in coffee) and theobromine (the stimulant in chocolate) as well as other chemicals which don't cause gout. If your adenine and guanine levels were low, your DNA would be falling apart.
    My father has had bouts of gout and I hear about his uric acid levels. Uric acid in the class of purines, but is not purine itself.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I agree about using levels in this sort of phrase, but it does seem that it's the uric acid levels that are too high, not the purines, from Ripper's information.
    "My platelet levels are too low" To say "My platelets are too low" makes no sense because we aren't describing the platelets themselves, just how few there are of them, the quantity. On the other hand, one could say "My red blood cells are too big, the doctor says," talking about mishapen cells in lay terms.
    Indeed:)
    If you google search for "serum purine concentration" you get about 5 total results and are asked the question "Do you mean 'serum uric concentration'?" That search has many many results:) The information in post #2 covers the situation. "He has high uric acid levels" (so he should avoid foods high in purines).
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    People who regularly get their blood, urine etcetera tested for different reasons will say this sort of thing. "My HGH is too high". Those they talk to may know what they are talking about (medics, other fellow suffers or friends who have been told all about it at length), or not. If they don't they will ask and be given the full perhaps boring detail.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    People who regularly get their blood, urine etcetera tested for different reasons will say this sort of thing. "My HGH is too high". Those they talk to may know what they are talking about (medics, other fellow suffers or friends who have been told all about it at length), or not. If they don't they will ask and be given the full perhaps boring detail.
    True, but purine is not a routine measurement the way uric acid or blood sugar are.:)
    (If your hGH is too high, you should cut back on the injections:D)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Hi,

    I wonder if it's natural to use the bold:

    His purine is high.

    I know that people don't use medical terms in their daily lives, but when it becomes too common, they do!

    I went to a dinner with my cousin, someone asked why my cousin didn't eat seafood.

    Thanks a lot
    So, back to your question. After reading all the quasi-medical stuff in here I feel none the wiser.
    My best bet on what to do in this context has now changed. Do not mention purines. Just say he has health issues which mean he has to avoid shellfish. ;)
     
    It is not that hard to find talk of purine levels in the blood. Of course, it's the uric acid levels, formed by breakdown, that are mentioned usually for gout.

    "purine levels in blood are usually underestimated."

    Indeed the author specifies, (consistent with Myridon in post #8) that purines include adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid.


    In my opinion the quote about 'purine' {one specific compound} in nature is somewhat misleading:

    "Purine (1) itself, has not been found in nature, but it can be produced by organic synthesis."

    In view of the fact that Wiki also says,

    A purine is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound. It consists of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. Purines, which include substituted purines and their tautomers, are the most widely occurring nitrogen-containing heterocycle in nature




    Purines and Myocardial Protection
    edited by Anwar-Saad A. Abd-Elfattah, Andrew Wechsler

    Purines and Myocardial Protection


    There is a chemical called purine and there is a class of chemicals called purines. According to Wikipedia, "Purine (1) itself, has not been found in nature, but it can be produced by organic synthesis." The class includes caffeine (the stimulant in coffee) and theobromine (the stimulant in chocolate) as well as other chemicals which don't cause gout. If your adenine and guanine levels were low, your DNA would be falling apart.
    My father has had bouts of gout and I hear about his uric acid levels. Uric acid in the class of purines, but is not purine itself.
     
    Last edited:

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    There is a chemical called purine and there is a class of chemicals called purines.
    I think Myridon was clear and not misleading in the first sentence of that post. What occurs in nature are the "purines" - a family of compounds that contain the "purine structure" (linked in the Wikipedia article Myridon linked to) The underivatized structure (i.e. the only compound called "purine" rather than "a purine", is not found in nature. "Purine" is not a commonly measured substance in serum - thiopurine is available as a test (and "purines" returns no results there).
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    Depending on the ailment in question us hypochondriacs may very well chat about our maladies and deficiencies without any very clear hnowledge of what we are talking about. Our cholesterol is high, haemocrit low or is it that it should be low; we may have high calcium levels. We take the potions and pills, we avoid various foods, all without really having a very adequate notion of what we are talking about.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Depending on the ailment in question us hypochondriacs may very well chat about our maladies and deficiencies without any very clear hnowledge of what we are talking about. Our cholesterol is high, haemocrit low or is it that it should be low; we may have high calcium levels. We take the potions and pills, we avoid various foods, all without really having a very adequate notion of what we are talking about.
    One day, the OP will return and explain what the sentence was intended to mean:D (and yes, haematocrit is the right term:eek: )
     
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