His satisfaction in <which happy imposition> on us appeared to be

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The narrator recalls his adolescence.
He visited his old nurse Peggoty's, who lives his home town with her husband, a coach man, Mr. Barkis.
And he just now met Mr. Barkis who was laid up in bed with acute rheumatism and now Mr. Barkis is taking some money out of his secret safe for the entertainment of him.

........................
In effect, we presently heard him uttering suppressed groans of the most dismal nature, as this magpie proceeding racked him in every joint, but, while Peggotty's eyes were full of compassion for him, she said his generous impulse would do him good, and it was better not to check it. So he groaned on, until he had got into bed again, suffering, I have no doubt, a martyrdom, and then called us in, pretending to have just woke up from a refreshing sleep, and to produce a guinea from under his pillow. His satisfaction in which happy imposition on us, and in preserved the impenetrable secret of the box, appeared to be a sufficient compensations to him for all his tortures.
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know if the relative adjective "which" modifies "happy," not "imposition."
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    The correct text:

    His satisfaction in which happy imposition on us, and in having preserved the impenetrable secret of the box, appeared to be a sufficient compensations to him for all his tortures.
    It applies to "imposition" and the imposition is also described as a happy one.

    He called DC and Peggotty in and insisted they accept a guinea from him to be used to buy food and drink for DC. He took satisfaction in this happy "imposition".

    I suppose Dickens calls it an imposition because Barkis insisted on DC accepting money from him (putting DC under an obligation to Barkis) but it was also "happy" as it was for DC's benefit.
     
    Last edited:

    Gabriel Aparta

    Senior Member
    Español - Venezuela
    Hi, everyone, I'm really having a hard time trying to understand why the word which is there. What does it mean or how does it modify the sentence?

    Thanks!
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    ...produce a guinea from under his pillow. His satisfaction in which happy imposition on us, and in having preserved the impenetrable secret of the box, appeared to be a sufficient compensations to him for all his tortures.

    His satisfaction in that happy imposition* on us and (his satisfaction in having preserved the secrets...appeared to be a sufficient compensation...

    * making us wait outside the room

    "Which" refers back to his action in the previous sentence.
     

    第二天

    New Member
    Chinese
    impose
    verb
    = deceive, trick, con (informal), dupe, hoodwink, pull the wool over (somebody's) eyes
    (Collins Thesaurus of the English Language)
    • He indicates a box underneath his bed, but he tells David that it's full of old clothes. He wishes it were money, but he assures David that it's not.
    • Mr. Barkis tells Peggotty to make David a good supper and offers her some money.
    • But he won't take the money out of his box (which is obviously not filled with old clothes) until David and Peggotty are out of the room. When he is alone, he will crawl painfully out of bed to pull out the box himself, because he's gotten really miserly.
    (Shmoop)
     
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