His voice is breaking.

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning, how do you say if a pubescent boy's voice is changing.

English: His voice is breaking.

Hungarian: Mutál. (yes, we use just one simple word, actually it means "mutating")

Czech: Mutuje. (the same as in Hungarian)
 
  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French:
    Sa voix est en train de muer \mɥe\
    or just:
    Il est en train de muer

    In French, muer and muter are different:
    une voix mue (from muer)
    un virus mute (
    from muter)
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan: Està canviant (or mudant) la veu = literally, [he/she] Is changing the voice.

    When they do, they also tend to fer galls (literally, 'to do roosters, that is, squawks, false notes, cracking voice').
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Boring as anything in Cymraeg/Welsh:

    Mae ei lais yn torri
    Is his S.M. voice PRED. breaking
    'His voice is breaking'

    Mae ei lais yn newid
    Is his S.M. voice PRED. changing
    'His voice is changing'
     
    Greek: «Η φωνή του κάνει κοκοράκια» [ifo̞ˈnitu ˈkani ko̞ko̞ˈɾaca] --> his voice does/makes cockerels; the v. is the 3rd p. Present Indicative of «κάνω» [ˈkano̞] --> to do, make < Classical v. «κάμνω» kắmnō.
    «Κοκοράκι/-κια» [ko̞ko̞ˈɾaci] (neut. nom. sinɡ.)/[ko̞ko̞ˈɾaca] (neut. nom. pl.) --> cockerel(s), diminutive of MoGr masc. noun «κόκορας» [ˈko̞ko̞ɾas̠] --> rooster, onomatopoeia from the rooster's crow «κοκορίκο» [ko̞ko̞ˈɾiko̞].

    Formally it's called «μεταφώνηση» [me̞taˈfo̞nis̠i] (fem.) --> voice chanɡe (from which the linɡuistic term metaphony derives), a compound: Classical prefix and preposition «μετά» mĕtắ + Classical fem. noun «φωνή» pʰōnḗ.
    His voice changes: «Μεταφωνίζει» [me̞tafo̞ˈniz̠i] (3rd p. Present Indicative sinɡ.).
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Catalan: Està canviant (or mudant) la veu
    His voice changes: «Μεταφωνίζει» [me̞tafo̞ˈniz̠i] (3rd p. Present Indicative sinɡ.).
    Italian: "Sta cambiando voce" = (He) is changing (his) voce.
    For languages that just say to change one's voice or something similar, isn't there some ambiguity with situations like, for example, if someone changes his voice to imitate another person? How do you resolve this ambiguity?
     
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    For languages that just say to change one's voice or something similar, isn't there some ambiguity with situations like, for example, if someone changes his voice to imitate another person? How do you resolve this ambiguity?
    By saying that s/he is mimicking someone's voice:
    «Μιμούμαι τη φωνή» [miˈmume̞ ˌtifo̞ˈni] --> to mimic the voice, «μιμείται τη φωνή» [miˈmite̞ ˌtifo̞ˈni] --> s/he mimics the voice. The v. is the deponent «μιμούμαι» [miˈmume̞] --> to mimic, imitate, copy < Classical denominative deponent v. «μῑμέομαι/μιμοῦμαι» mīméŏmai (uncontracted)/mīmoûmai (contracted) --> to mimic < Classical masc. noun «μῖμος» mîmŏs --> mime (of unknown etymoloɡy, per Beekes it's Pre-Greek). Even today, we call the actor who imitates another person's (of well-known, celebrity status) voice, a «μίμος» [ˈmimo̞s̠] (masc. and fem.).
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    For languages that just say to change one's voice or something similar, isn't there some ambiguity with situations like, for example, if someone changes his voice to imitate another person? How do you resolve this ambiguity?
    "Cambiare voce" is a bit of a set phrase, it's not really used to describe any other situation. Besides, context usually clears all doubts away. If you wanted to say something like "He talked to her on the phone but he changed his voice so that she wouldn't recognize him" I supposed other verbs would normally be employed (alterare, camuffare, travisare...) but even if you use "cambiare" it's pretty clear you don't mean to say that he turned himself into a boy going through puberty.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    @Yendred For languages that just say to change one's voice or something similar, isn't there some ambiguity with situations like, for example, if someone changes his voice to imitate another person? How do you resolve this ambiguity?

    ________

    In our Welsh case I suppose we'd say something like,

    Mae o'n newid ei lais er mwyn dynwared X
    Is he PRED changing his S.M. voice in-order-to S.M. imitate X
    He is changing/changes his voice to imitate X

    Mae o'n addasu ei lais ...
    Is he PRED adapting his S.M. voice ...
    He is adapting/adapts his voice ...
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    In English, 'his voice is changing' refers to the overall change during puberty. 'His voice is breaking' and 'his voice is cracking' refer to the phenomenon that occurs discontinuously for an instant or two during the process. One may notice that a young man's voice is changing without hearing it 'break' or 'crack.'
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Do you say it in English or in Irish? :confused:
    And I assume it is her boobs have dropped for girls, right?
    In English of course (like most Irish people these days, I can't speak Irish fluently). No, there's no equivalent for girls. :D

    It seems to be more commonly used in British English than AmE according to Professor Google (I should note too that it's not the same register as one's voice, erm, breaking).
     
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    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    @Encolpius: And I assume it is her boobs have dropped for girls, right?

    _________

    The opposite I'd imagine. If a girl's boobs have dropped (or more exactly, 'sagged') she's more likely to be an octogenarian ... (With apologies for the obvious sexism and ageism.)
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Do you say it in English or in Irish? :confused:
    And I assume it is her boobs have dropped for girls, right?
    Speaking as a woman who has nursed a baby and gone through menopause, one's breasts begin to change shape after one has nursed a baby.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    We also say (in Ireland at least) that "his balls have dropped" to indicate the onset of puberty (for males, obviously).
    It seems to be more commonly used in British English than AmE according to Professor Google (I should note too that it's not the same register as one's voice, erm, breaking).
    Oh, it is definitely used in AE too but it might be more politically incorrect to say it, as is the case with all these types of colorful words and expressions on the western side of the Atlantic.
     
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