hit a hot tub

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beautifulmind

Senior Member
Chinese
Typically, they rely on statistical models to predict which students will take them up on their offers to attend. But this year, with the economy turning parents and students into bargain hunters, demographics changing and unexpected jolts in the price of gas and the number of applications, they have little faith on those models.
“Trying to hit those numbers is like trying to hit a hot tub when you’re skydiving from 30,000 feet,” said Jennifer Delahunty, dean of admissions and financial aid at Kenyon College in Ohio. “I’m going to go to church every day in April.”
How should I understand this sentence in bold? especially hit a hot tub...
 
  • Suspishio

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi beautifulmind,

    I suspect that quite a few readers of this thread will have to read your question more than once. The problem I have (and maybe it's just me missing something) is to justify the dean's comment to the context.

    Fortunately, answering your question doesn't pose the same challenge.

    “Trying to hit those numbers is like trying to hit a hot tub when you’re skydiving from 30,000 feet

    The dean could have chosen any object inplace of "hot tub". But the expression means a degree of accuracy in finding a defined target when in a random situation.

    Does it help to liken the expression to "pointing at a person from 30,000 feet and being sure that it's your mother, your hot tub, your car"?
     
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