hit parade vs charts

loviii

Senior Member
russian
Good day!

oxforddictionaries.com:
the hit parade - [singular] (dated) a weekly listing of the current bestselling pop records

oxforddictionaries.com:
the charts - [plural] a weekly listing of the current bestselling pop records

oxforddictionaries.com:
She topped the charts for eight weeks
oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com:
The album went straight into the charts at number 1.
collinsdictionary.com:
Suede are once again riding high in the hit parade with their new single.
oxforddictionaries.com:
A better leading indicator of the politicization of pop was the first appearance of a Seeger composition on the hit parade.

Are these synonyms and interchangeable (not counting plural/singular form)?

Thanks!
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think hit parade is old-fashioned.

    There was an old U.S. radio and television program that was on the air for 25 years called "Your Hit Parade". But it stopped being broadcast in 1959.

    I don't know if usage in the UK is different.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I’m pretty sure that pop music buffs would tell you they’re not interchangeable (and go into great historical detail as to why!).
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't know the finer details of this matter, but I do know that in the UK the term "hit parade" wasn't confined to a particular television or radio programme, and that it remained in use until well after 1959. I don't know if it's still in use.

    I don't believe that "album hit parade" has ever been an established term, but I've heard and read the term "album chart".

    All very abstruse for the younger generation that doesn't buy physical albums!
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    According to Google Ngram Viewer, "hit parade" came into existence in the 1930s and is still going strong, though less popular today than it was 20 years ago. "Pop charts" was born in the 1950s and is today nearly 3 times more popular.

    It's not really possible to compare with "the charts" because that phrase has a far wider range of meaning.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top