hit/struck home

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carolmoraiss

Banned
Portuguese
Hi!

In this sentence, does "strike/hit home" mean the same as "touch a sore spot" or had a "very negative effect"?

“In the months to come, the image of Paris reduced to cinders struck home many times.” Paris, Capital of Modernity

The author is talking about the of the end of the civil war in the 1880s' in France, whose many buildings had been reduced to ashes.

Thank You!

Here's the link to the book: https://books.google.com.br/books?i...he image of Paris reduced to cinders"&f=false
 
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  • Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    The literal meaning of "stike home" is that a blow or a weapon has hit its intended target. For example, in the English translation of Rostand's play, Cyrano de Bergerac tells Valvert that as they duel, Cyrano will improvise a poem, and:
    "At the very last line of the piece,
    I'll thrust -- and I'll strike home
    ."
    Cyrano then does just that, stabbing Valvert with his sword as he finishes his poem. You can also use the term figuratively, speaking of words or sights that affect us emotionally in the way that a blow or a weapon would affect physically:

    While Mary acted nonchalant when Jane laughed at her new outfit, Jane's comments must have struck home, because Mary never wore those clothes again.
     
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    carolmoraiss

    Banned
    Portuguese
    That's a very throrough explanation, Mahatongo! So, just one more question, when you use the expression, does it necessarily mean something negative? I've been thinking of the expression "hit the sore spot", for example...

    Thanks!
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    It's usually negative, because being struck by a fist or a weapon is usually negative. But what of Cupid's arrows?

    Margaret's explanation about how they help injured puppies at the animal shelter struck home, and wealthy old Mrs. Jones agreed to give the shelter $10,000 in memory of her late poodle Coco.
     

    carolmoraiss

    Banned
    Portuguese
    Dear friends,

    I'm having a hard time understanding what the author meant with "struck home" here. I'm sure some context will be needed so that you might feel able to help me.

    Because of the Commune and the bloodletting of the civil war in France in 1871, the city was being brought down to ashes. Meanwhile, there was a group of highly conservative religious monarquists who wanted to build the basilic of Sacre-Coeur in order to expiate France's sins commited by the communists. They circulated a pamphlet argumenting why the basilic should really be built, and why it should be built in Paris. They also said that, even if the city were reduced to cinders, they would still want to avowl their national faults and proclaim the justice of God in its ruins. Well, even though communists were gaining a lot of territory, they were terribly massacrated by the forces of order. But this only happened in May, and the author is describing what the atmosphere was in the country in March. Well, here is the paragraph:

    "On March 18, Parisians had taken their first irrevocable steps toward establishing self-government under the Commune. The real or imagined sins of the Communards were subsequently to shock and outrage bourgeois and, even more vociferously, provincial opinion. And since much of Paris was indeed reduced to cinders in the course of a civil war of incredible ferocity, the notion of building a basilica of expiation upon these ashes became more and more appealing. As Rohault de Fleury noted, with evident satisfaction, “In the months to come, the image of Paris reduced to cinders struck home many times.” (Paris, Capital of Modernity) By the way, Fleury was one of the advocators for the construction of the Basilic.

    I know it must be really hard to give me suggestions without reading this extensive book and without knowing the context very well. I thought of synonyms like: "hitting the sore spot" or "hit the nail on the head" or "made perfect sense" or "made it very clear". But, to be honest, I don't know which way to go... I'm more inclined to choose "hit the nail on the head"...

    Thanks!
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yes. It moved them deeply because it was a deep shock. Think of the images of the Twin Towers going down in New York on 9/11. Those are images that have struck home many times.
     

    carolmoraiss

    Banned
    Portuguese
    Oh, God! Thanks for showing me that. I was looking for it but somehow I didn't find it.
    I did remember what we discussed, but I was still confused, so I decided to start from scratch. I should have actually picked up from where I had stopped. I'm sorry, I didn't realize it was there =(
     
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