'hit the vase' or 'hit the stick against the vase'

Sunbee

Banned
Korean
Hi!

He hit the vase with the stick.
He hit the stick on/against the vase.

What is the difference between the two?
I wonder if the expression of 'hit (the target)'is more natural than 'hit (the tool)', considering the meaning of 'hit'.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would only use the first one -- your concern about the second version is justified: it certainly doesn't sound idiomatic.
     

    Sunbee

    Banned
    Korean
    What if 'He hit the stick on/against the table.'?
    I read a grammarian's explanation that the expression of 'hit the tool on/against something' is natural when it is not a lot affected by doing some action with the tool.
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, that's fine -- but the table would normally be stronger than the stick, not weaker (depends on the stick and the table, of course). I think in your two examples, the first word is probably the focus for the reader: the vase, the stick. But it doesn't have to be. It's all back to context
     
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