hiv-cabbage

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papeya

Senior Member
italian
Can someone suggest a word which is similar to "cabbage" but has something to do with HIV? It has to be written on a banner. Thank you very much!
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Absolutely nothing comes to mind! When you say that "it is similar to cabbage," do you mean that it sounds like the word "cabbage," or that it's a vegetable of some sort?
     

    papeya

    Senior Member
    italian
    I mean sonething which is written in a similar way and can be misread if you don't pay much attention to the banner or it is folded by the wind...
     

    papeya

    Senior Member
    italian
    With all due respect, Papeya, your first post was confusing - see Joelline's post in response. What do HIV and cabbage have in common?
    Nothing. The word cabbage has got nothing in common with HIV because it is not the right word to be written on a banner about HIV. My question is if someone can suggest the right word, that I don't know, which can be confused with cabbage (perhaps because ends with -bage, or begins with cab-). Is it clearer?I hope so.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Without more information, this is a guessing game.
    It seems that we are being asked to think of a word beginning cab- or ending with -bage that has something to do with HIV so that Papeya can write it on a banner.
    If we knew the purpose of writing anything on this banner it would help.
    If we knew why Papeya wants to link HIV with a word that looks rather like cabbage, that would help too.

    If, on the other hand, Papeya has already seen a glimpse of this word on a banner, there is more context available. Where was the banner? What was the occasion?
     

    papeya

    Senior Member
    italian
    Ok, it's a novel. The protagonist say he saw the banner and he read HIV and something similar to cabbage but that couldn't be. Another banner was 'Rubbers for Revolution'. Can it help? Thanks again.
     

    papeya

    Senior Member
    italian
    Well, I think it is about the use of preservatives (rubbers). It is set in Ireland, and now that a come to think of it, it is a meaningful detail, isn't it?
     

    GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    It could be virtually anything, and I have this sneaking feeling that, since the scene described is from a novel, it is there for a particular reason, which either makes sense in the immediate context, or will be revealed as the plot unfolds, sooner or later, if we credit the author with knowing how to write.
    If papeya had been to some sort of rally, and briefly glimpsed a cabbage-like slogan, I'd be more inclined to wade through disambiguation lists of various legumes, and words with long-stemmed double consonants in the middle. No offense of course, but I for one would prefer to read the book and make an informed guess, rather than stabbing in the dark. As I understand it, even if someone randomly hit the "right" vegetable, papeya would not be in a position to confirm.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    I've had overnight to think about this one. I don't think we have to "find the vegetable"; I think we have to find a word that contains some of the same letters that are found in "cabbage"--letters that could be hidden if the banner flopped around in the breeze.

    I've come to the conclusion that a good guess is that it's "ravage"!! If it's about HIV and contains a word that ends in -age, then "ravage" (as in "HIV ravages our youth") is at least a candidate!
     

    papeya

    Senior Member
    italian
    Joelline, Thanks, you finally understood my question. I know it was quite odd, but that's the point. I read the book almost four time or more, and it is not crucial to know the right sentence on the banner, so it is not explained. My question is due to the fact that I'm translating it, so I must adapt the similarity between the two words in Italina s well. Thanks for the suggestion then.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    It is possible that the author has played a trick on the reader in that there is no such word but is causing you to delve deeply into your mind to examine a subject that the author wishes to engage you by searching for something that does not exist. In this way the author's message is spread far beyond the readers of the book as reader after reader poses the same question to their friends and aquaintences that you have posted here.

    There is probably a term for it. Advertisers do it all the time with a spot strategy where they put unattributed mentions of a forthcoming attraction and not explain it just to get people wondering before the product is identified.

    .,,
     
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