Ho fatto un volo pazzesco

rafanadal

Senior Member
Italian
Hi there.
The sentence in question is: "Sono caduto dalla bicicletta. Ho fatto un volo pazzesco"

Can we translate like this: "I fell off my bike. Had a crazy wipeout" OR "I fell off my bike. I wiped out really hard".

There is the word "tumble" as well but the word "volo" in Italian (very informal) evokes a bad crash. Can we use wipeout or are there other evocative informal expressions?
 
  • Lula0310

    Member
    English
    "I had a crazy wipeout" e "I wiped out really hard" sono tutte e due guiste - ma anche molto informale e, a me, suonano piu' AE di BE. In inghilterra direi "I had a really nasty fall" o "I had a really bad fall".

    Ha ragione che "tumble" sarebbe usato per una caduta non molto grave.

    (Per favore correggermi se faccio sbagli - volgio sempre migliorare il mio italiano)
     

    ohbice

    Senior Member
    "I had a crazy wipeout" e "I wiped out really hard" sono tutte e due giuste - ma anche molto informali e, a me, suonano piu' AE che BE. In Inghilterra direi "I had a really nasty fall" o "I had a really bad fall".

    Ha (hai) ragione nel dire che "tumble" sarebbe la scelta corretta per indicare una caduta non molto grave.

    (Per favore correggermi se faccio sbagli - voglio sempre migliorare il mio italiano)

    In Italiano le cose sono molto meno concise :)
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "I had a crazy wipeout" e "I wiped out really hard" sono tutte e due guiste - ma anche molto informale e, a me, suonano piu' AE di BE. In inghilterra direi "I had a really nasty fall" o "I had a really bad fall".
    I agree. "I had a crazy wipeout" and "I wiped out really hard" sound AE to me. (They may in addition be considered slang in AE, but I don't know.) An alternative suggestion: "I really went sprawling."
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I agree. "I had a crazy wipeout" and "I wiped out really hard" sound AE to me. (They may in addition be considered slang in AE, but I don't know.)

    Yes, I would say that "to wipe out" is slang, or at least extremely colloquial, in AE. Based on the OP, though, "un volo" for a fall seems to be in the same register. And for what it's worth, I would only use the second version, "I wiped out," not "I had a wipeout." But that might just be me.
     

    Mikeo38

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    Doesn't "wipeout" refer just to surfing?
    Never heard it (in BE anyway) to mean "falling over".

    One other interesting point: in BE the difference between "to have a fall" and "to fall over"
    The former is what happens to older people; "My elderly neighbour had a fall and broke her hip."
    Often "having a fall" can lead to complications for older people; the resulting injury can even precipitate death.

    A younger person would never say of himself/herself, "I had a fall and broke my hip."
    A younger person would say, "I fell over and broke my hip."

    M
     
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