hoeden (to hat)

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
Do you have a verb based on a head cover in your language? We have hoeden as a verb meaning " to protect" mainly. Like behoeden voor (protect against, prevention), varkenshoeder (the pig boy, like the cow-boy, which we do not translate), op zijn hoede zijn (on one's guard), etc. They are not very common nowadays though.

"To heed" might be something similar. As a matter of fact, etymonline.com links it [if that is the perfect word here in English] with an IE root leading to hat... Heeding has to do with protection, respect. And of course a link with hood (kap in Dutch) seems self-evident...

So: how about your language?
 
  • Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    Kαπέλο [ka'pelo] means hat.
    We have the verb καπελώνω [kape'lono] which literally means "to put a hat on someone's head" and metaphorically "to impose my views/ideas on others", with the connotation of manipulation.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Perfect! Very interesting!

    Would you think that has to do with some kind of negative perception of a hat? I just mean that I could imagine some other metaphor with a hat, but not that one, not a really negative one. We might say: "ik zet een ander petje op" (I put on a different cap) when we play two (or more) roles: once you are just a man/woman, some other time you are an officer of some kind...
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Would you think that has to do with some kind of negative perception of a hat?
    I think so. I associate that meaning with the concepts of "to cast a shadow over someone" or "to limit someone's abilities to think and to act independently".
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Could you find that Association back in other words or expressions? Around here hats were meant to protect against rain and the cold in general, I think, whereas you had the sun… I do know of "onder één hoedje spelen" (conspiracy, to play under one little hat), but what the origin is, although it might have to do with cover-ups, which is part of the original meaning of our "hoed", I think.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Although it's obvious that a hat can protect against the rain, the cold or the sun, I don't see that meaning in the Greek verb.
    If you forcefully put someone under your umbrella or if you forcefully put your hat on someone else's head, then you try to dominate, manipulate, patronize them. This is how I understand the Greek verb.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I think you are right! I am so surprised simply to find that the basic assumptions underlying the concept/… head cover ("hat") are so different. About any assumption might be wrong, except for the idea of a head cover (which we should then not associate with protection automatically, I guess). Thanks a lot!
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    In Spanish, there's gorrear and gorronear; both of them meaning to make something free because others pay for it.
    In Honduran Spanish, there's sombrerear with two different meanings: 1) to frighten someone with menaces. 2) to treat a superior as if s/he had the same ranking than you.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Do you have a verb based on a head cover in your language?
    Russian "прошляпить" (proshlyápit') - lit. ~"to hat through", meaning "to lose/miss sth, typically due to the lack of attention or wit"; from "шляпа" (shlyápa) - "a hat"; coll., dated "a person lacking attention and/or practical wit and suffering from that".
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French:
    chapeauter (literally to "hat" / to cover with a hat) means to head / to oversee / to manage.

    Also these expressions exist:
    1) porter le chapeau - literally to wear the hat - means to be accountable for something.
    2) faire porter le chapeau (à quelqu'un) - literally to make (somebody) wear the hat - means to blame somebody for something.
    Generally, the expressions imply that the responsibility is intentionally put on the wrong person.
    The expression comes from the fact that different forms of hat were originally symbols of social background, and social categorization of people.
    I think the corresponding idiomatic English expressions are "to carry the can" (1) or "to leave somebody hold the bag/the baby" (2).
     
    Last edited:

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    There's 'cap' in English as a verb, rather than 'hat' itself: to put a cover on, to be a cover, to provide an appropriate climax/conclusion, to place a limit.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    As in Dutch. Funny thing is: we can say it in French ("Chapeau!") or in Dutch ("Hoedje af!" [Hat off, lit.]...

    There's 'cap' in English as a verb, rather than 'hat' itself: to put a cover on, to be a cover, to provide an appropriate climax/conclusion, to place a limit.
    That reminds me of the Calimero story, whereas that is about an eggshell, not a regular hat... Someone blames others whereas it might be his/her own fault...
     
    Last edited:

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    In French:
    chapeauter (literally to "hat" / to cover with a hat) means to head / to oversee / to manage.

    Also these expressions exist:
    1) porter le chapeau - literally to wear the hat - means to be accountable for something.
    2) faire porter le chapeau (à quelqu'un) - literally to make (somebody) wear the hat - means to blame somebody for something.
    Generally, the expressions imply that the responsibility is intentionally put on the wrong person.
    The expression comes from the fact that different forms of hat were originally symbols of social background, and social categorization of people.
    I think the corresponding idiomatic English expressions are "to carry the can" (1) or "to leave somebody hold the bag/the baby" (2).
    Great! I cannot see a parallel with (1) and (2) in Dutch. But I do see one link, I think: "ik zet een ander petje op" means that I choose to play a different social role. I mean: I can be seen as Thomas, but I can also be seen as a teacher, a student, a self-employed person, etc.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Funny thing is: we can say it in French ("Chapeau!") or in Dutch ("Hoedje af!" [Hat off, lit.]...
    Yes "Chapeau !" is a common French expression. It means "Congratulations!" (especially when the accomplished task was considered a tough one).
    It is an abbreviation of "Je vous/te tire mon chapeau !" (literally matching something like "I take my hat off at you").
    We may also say "Chapeau bas !" (literally "Hat downwards").
     
    Last edited:

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    ...and in Spanish
    Spelled "Chapeau" as is? I thought you would have "españolized" the spelling to make the spelling and pronounciation match, but the problem is the [ʃ] sound does not exist in Spanish :eek: Does it?
    Unless you pronounce it [tʃapo] ;)
     
    Last edited:
    Spelled "Chapeau" as is?
    Well RAE includes "chapó" but since it's mostly something belonging to spoken language, I guess you could find both in informal texts, especially if the speaker is just a bit familiar with French which is not rare at all.

    Unless you pronounce it [tʃapo] ;)
    There's for sure people pronuncing it that way, probably a majority in fact. I for one used to, but I think I'd rather pronounce it with /ʃ/ now. (Catalan does have /ʃ/ but my idiolect doesn't word-initially, also I guess the spelling exerts some influence).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top