hold sway

< Previous | Next >

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
After the bruising rows of the 1990's - culminating in a series of public debates under the banner GM Nation, and the biggest open air experiments ever undertaken in the shape of the farm scale trials of genetically modified crops - an uneasy standoff has held sway. Although not illegal, to date no GM crops have been grown commercially in the British countryside.
Source:
What would it take to break the impasse on GM crops? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18593639

sway = control, influence

Does it mean that an uneasy standoff took control over the whole debate about GM crops?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it's being used here to indicate that the uneasy stand-off has endured or persisted, ie. since the 1990's, there has been an uneasy stand-off. I'm not convinced that this is standard usage.
    They would have done better (I think) to say that '...an uneasy stand-off has been in place', or simply '...there has been an uneasy stand-off'.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top