holiday, break, day off

amby

Banned
chinese
There is a red day on the calandear, such as independence day in the US and if you want to find out what your friends or coworker will do on that day, what do you say?

What are you doing tomorrow? Tomorrow is a holiday.
What are you doing during the break? Tomorros is a holiday.
What ar you doing during the holiday?
What are you doing druing the day off?

What is the most common way to ask the question?
 
  • JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    What are you doing tomorrow?:tick: This is fine. ("Tomorrow is a holiday" probably isn't necessary because people aren't likely to forget that.)
    What are you doing during the break? :tick:or :cross: I wouldn't use this to refer to just one day off - it would have to be at least a long weekend (I think in BrE this would be called a "mini-break"?) and probably more like a week or so off. But actually, I probably wouldn't use this at all unless I was indicating a specific and recognized school or legislative break, such as "Easter break," "summer break" or "Christmas break."
    What are you doing during the holiday? :tick: Maybe - but I'd be more likely to say "over the holiday."
    What are you doing during the day off? :cross: This sounds the least likely to me. There's nothing actually wrong with it, I just wouldn't say it that way. I might say "during your day off," but I don't think I'd use this in reference to a day that just about everybody, including me, has off.
     
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    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    You seem to be talking about a single day, not a week or a long weekend.

    I've usually heard something like, "Any special plans for the holiday?" Or, "Doing anything special tomorrow?" Or, "What are your plans for the holiday?"

    By the way, we always capitalize the name of a special observance such as Independence Day, Memorial Day, etc.
     

    buoo

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Speaking of holiday, today's my country's Memorial Day. Hence the question, what do you call such day as Mother's Day? I heard on Mother's day you go to work and school, as opposed to day, like, -- I'm sorry I don't know on which holiday you don't go to work or school.(Memorial Day, I believe is the one) Anyway, is there a way to distinguish the two different type of days you're celebrating?
    For example, would 'day off' fit the bill? To me it sounds like you take a day off work or school. So "In my country, Mother's day is a day off." Not true, but for the sake of example, does this work?

    Thank you.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Actually, Mother's Day and Father's Day are always on Sunday, which is the traditional day off here (although many stores and all restaurants, movies, etc. are open on Sunday; banks, schools, and most business offices are closed, though).

    I'm trying to think of holidays on which we don't have a day off from work and school. Ah, Valentine's Day is one. Halloween is another that comes to mind.

    Most holidays do mean a day off.
     

    buoo

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Parla
    So what different way can you refer to 'Valentine's Day'?
    It's not a holiday, nor a day off. Then?
    Okay.. Valentine's Day is Valentine's Day.. I know this is just somewhat out of the question, stupid.
    But actually I think my first language include two different vocabulary for each occasion: One for the holiday, the other for the day we celebrate but not as a day off from work and school. (They are generic in sense, not specific as Valentine's Day or Memorial Day.)
     
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    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Valentine's Day (and St. Patrick's Day and Mother's Day and all those days that are special but are not usually days off) are still called "holidays," at least in AmE. The only way you can tell which holidays provide days off and which do not is custom and context. There is a special term: legal holiday. This is used for any holiday that is customarily considered a day off by the state and/or federal government. It's not 100 percent useful for the many people, including me, who don't get quite as many days off as federal employees, but it is a frequently used term anyway.

    Another term that might be pertinent is "observed holiday," which is used to differentiate between the actual holiday itself (e.g., Christmas Day, Dec. 25) and the extra day off. For example, if Christmas falls on a Sunday, which most of us already have off, the observed holiday would be Monday, Dec. 26. I hope this isn't more than you really wanted to know, but it's the closest I can come to your question about one word for the holiday and another for a day that's celebrated but not as a day off.
     

    buoo

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I hope this isn't more than you really wanted to know, but it's the closest I can come to your question about one word for the holiday and another for a day that's celebrated but not as a day off.
    Thank you for your time and effort, JustKate. It's very informative. You're more than welcome to give as much information as you want. I'll be glad if you do so. Thank you.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Sometimes we will jokingly call a holiday which no one gets off work a "Hallmark holiday." This is because Hallmark is the name of a very big company that makes greeting cards, and the joke is that the company invented these holidays to sell more of cards. We would use this, not so much for traditional holidays such as Valentine's Day, but for things like Mothers Day, Fathers Day, and especially for new holidays such as Administrative Assistant Day or Boss's Day (yes, those are on the calendar).
     
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