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...holiday we had from school, "running" to a beach...

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Lyng, Oct 2, 2009.

  1. Lyng Member

    Kinh
    Hi

    I want to know what grammar issue used in the word "running" in this sentence:
    Today is like a holiday we used to have from school, running to a beach to be the first one in the pool.

    I think the original sentence is:
    Today is like a holiday we used to have from school and run to a beach to be the first one in the pool.

    Please enlighten me.
    Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2009
  2. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    I had an idea, but then I realized that in the first sentence, I don't know whether running is what they used to do, or whether it is what they are doing now, or both.

    Do you know?

    I should know before I try to describe the structure.
     
  3. Lyng Member

    Kinh
    Hi Cagey,
    I am quite sure that running is what they used to do in this case.
    Please describe the structure for me. :)

    I think I have heard of something like 'present participle used for reduced relative adjective clause with active meaning.'

    Thank you.
     
  4. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    I would say that the version with a participle is equivalent in meaning to:
    Today is like a holiday we used to have from school, when we ran to a beach to be the first one in the pool.
    Here "when we ran ...." is a relative clause describing holiday, that is, it is adjectival.

    Is this the kind of answer you need?
     
  5. Lyng Member

    Kinh
    I think so. Thank you, Cagey.
     

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