homage

  • MrJamSandwich

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Technically, an homage - the old rule is an with a noun beginning with h - but this is so out of use in everyday spoken English that it seems wrong to say an homage. Having said that, there are a lot more Google results for an homage than there are for a homage - so while the latter reflects modern speech, in writing, an homage seems to be the accepted 'correct' form.
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    I would say an homage -- with a silent h and emphasis on the second syllable as is is pronounced in french. Curiously, when I use the phrase to pay homage, I pronounce the h and emphasize the first syllable.
     

    MrJamSandwich

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    That's very interesting, MissFit! It seems completely bizarre to me, but interesting! As a British English speaker I'd say homage, pronouncing the h and stressing the first syllable, regardless of context!
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    That's very interesting, MissFit! It seems completely bizarre to me, but interesting! As a British English speaker I'd say homage, pronouncing the h and stressing the first syllable, regardless of context!
    That's because you were trained to pronounce the h in herbs, as those on your sandwich:)

    It's just another of those pesky BE/AE differences in custom.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    That's because you were trained to pronounce the h in herbs, as those on your sandwich

    It's just another of those pesky BE/AE differences in custom.
    Same here-- I pronounce it without an aitch, accent on first syllable, void of any hint that the word is French.

    By that I mean I say OMM-idge (as in porridge) not om-AZH (as in garage). That may be a little confusing because a lot of Americans pronounce garage "g'RODGE."

    The word hommage has also entered AE fairly recently...uhh, that is, during my adult lifetime. It is used by film and other arts critics, and indicates a film where a director showcases his indebtedness to a prior artist who had an influence on him-- or spoofs them, as Mel Brooks did in High Anxiety (said to be an hommage to Hitchcock).

    Homage is a much more general word, hence the retro-gallic variation fills a special need and I don't find it especially pretentious. I sure wouldn't use it at the local watering hole, though.
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