Homie

The MEAT Maestro

Member
Inglese; Norte America
Hello, I would like to know how to say "homie" or some kind of equvilent such as "good friend" or "ally" in a very informal sense in all world languages if you would, please. I'm looking for a way for a young person to address a close friend, something like the context of "What's up, homie", or "How's it goin', brother/sister"
 
  • PoLa-PoLL

    New Member
    Spanish/English (Mexico)
    It depends the sense you want to give it in spanich you can use:
    amigo, carnal, just the short name, cuate...
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Farsi is generally a very formal language (it's even formal when you're insulting someone! :) ); thus, there aren't many informalities. But here's a few that I can think of

    O bucha! The equivalent of hey boy
    Like if you're really good friends with someone: your homeboy.

    O dukhtur The equivalent of hey girl
    Like if you're really good friends with someone: your homegirl. I'd say this is less used than o bucha.

    We sometimes use the word diwana (which means crazy) to identify friends, like hey crazy. Okay so it doesn't sound normal in English to identify your friends by "crazy", but it works in Farsi.

    Bien
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    The MEAT Maestro said:
    Hello, I would like to know how to say "homie" or some kind of equvilent such as "good friend" or "ally" in a very informal sense in all world languages if you would, please. I'm looking for a way for a young person to address a close friend, something like the context of "What's up, homie", or "How's it goin', brother/sister"

    Do you mean somethng like "fella"?

    I think "Homie" is used in Germany, too, at least among teens. But it is rather ridiculous and useless to use that word with your parents (when speaking about your friends). There are many other expressions for your so-called "homie":

    Alter
    Freund
    Kerl
    Kumpel
    Typ

    "How's it going" can be translated literally as "Wie geht's?", but we prefer "Was geht (ab)?" (What's going [up]?). :)
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    In Arabic, the normal word for friend is صديق (sadiiq), but you could say رفيق (rafiiq) or نديم (nadiim) as a loose equivalent of "homie" or "good friend" or "buddy" as they have connotations of having a closer firendship than just 'sadiiq'. But for really informal purposes, you could use عم ('amm). It usually means uncle, but is also used to mean something like 'buddy' when addressing a good friend. A realy informal, colloquial way of saying "What's up?" is akhbaarak eeh?" So "What's up, homie?" could be translated as "akhbaarak eeh, ya 'ammi?"
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I think because the word "homie" is informal we don't need to discuss words in standard Arabic. To me, صديق and رفيق are formal, standard words that mean "friend." As for نديم, it's a very poetic word - rarely used in formal settings, let alone in informal settings.

    Of the four words you mention, عم seems to be the closest in connotation to "homie." However, you should specify what dialect you are referring to; I assume عم is common in Egyptian Arabic. It's understood by Palestinians but not used very frequently with this meaning in Palestinian Arabic. In fact, to us عمي or عمو (which you use in your translation of "what's up, homie?") are more often used to show respect to older men, rather akin to the English "sir." As for "what's up?" our equivalent of "akhbaarak eeh" would be "shuu/eesh akhbaarak?" but for "what's up?" we usually just say "eesh" (what?).

    Some Palestinian Arabic words that are used in the same way as "homie" are نظيف (ndiif - literally "clean"), حلو (Hilu - literally "beautiful, handsome"), and بطل (baTal - literally "hero, champion"). Note that these are all masculine.

    So "what's up, homie?" would be "eesh ya ndiif/Hilu/baTal?" in Palestinian Arabic.

    If I think of other equivalents, I'll come back and post them.
     

    scotu

    Senior Member
    Chicago English
    Mexico:
    Formal: Que paso hermano? Less formal: Que rollo primo?(or cuate,or carnal, or compa, or yerno
    The most likely translation for "what' up homie would be: "Que honda buey?"* Intimate older males might say "Que paso cabron?"*
    *a forigner should avoid using these terms as they may be taken offensively. Said forigner would be safe with: Que paso primo?
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    elroy said:
    Of the four words you mention, عم seems to be the closest in connotation to "homie." However, you should specify what dialect you are referring to; I assume عم is common in Egyptian Arabic. It's understood by Palestinians but not used very frequently with this meaning in Palestinian Arabic. In fact, to us عمي or عمو (which you use in your translation of "what's up, homie?") are more often used to show respect to older men, rather akin to the English "sir." As for "what's up?" our equivalent of "akhbaarak eeh" would be "shuu/eesh akhbaarak?" but for "what's up?" we usually just say "eesh" (what?).
    Yes, I forgot to clarify that I was talking about Egyptian Arabic. The 'i' that I put at the end of the 'ammi' is the first person pronominal suffix (my friend) Of course, you could say it without it (akhbaarak eeh, ya 'amm), but it's more personal when you say it with the pronominal suffix.

    Yes, عم also is used to show respect to an older man in Egyptian as well, but it is common to use it as an address to (close) friends as well.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I agree with what Elroy said.
    We also sometimes use "baTal" (champ).

    Josh Adkins said:
    Yes, I forgot to clarify that I was talking about Egyptian Arabic. The 'i' that I put at the end of the 'ammi' is the first person pronominal suffix (my friend) Of course, you could say it without it (akhbaarak eeh, ya 'amm), but it's more personal when you say it with the pronominal suffix.

    Yes, عم also is used to show respect to an older man in Egyptian as well, but it is common to use it as an address to (close) friends as well.
    This also is true. But I disagree with what you say about the final "i" making it more informal. In fact we use it without the "i", like an indefinite word : eih ya 3amm. Eih akhbarak/3amel eih ya 3amm.

    It may be interesting to note that sometimes girls use it between each others (i.e. same form, not feminised "3amma/3ammeti" which would sound very strange)
     

    Brazilian dude

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Mexico:
    Formal: Que paso hermano? Less formal: Que rollo primo?(or cuate,or carnal, or compa, or yerno
    The most likely translation for "what' up homie would be: "Que honda buey?"* Intimate older males might say "Que paso cabron?"*
    *a forigner should avoid using these terms as they may be taken offensively. Said forigner would be safe with: Que paso primo?
    Funny.

    Brazilian dude
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    cherine said:
    This also is true. But I disagree with what you say about the final "i" making it more informal. In fact we use it without the "i", like an indefinite word : eih ya 3amm. Eih akhbarak/3amel eih ya 3amm.
    More personal, not informal. Like I said, it can be used either way. In any language when you insert a personal pronoun, it makes it more personal.

    It may be interesting to note that sometimes girls use it between each others (i.e. same form, not feminised "3amma/3ammeti" which would sound very strange)
    That is interesting. I've heard sheekha (of course used sarcastically), but not 'amm.
     

    Henryk

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    Whodunit said:
    I think "Homie" is used in Germany, too, at least among teens. But it is rather ridiculous and useless to use that word with your parents (when speaking about your friends). There are many other expressions for your so-called "homie":

    Alter
    Freund
    Kerl
    Kumpel
    Typ

    "How's it going" can be translated literally as "Wie geht's?", but we prefer "Was geht (ab)?" (What's going [up]?). :)
    Among teens who listen to hip hop you'll hear "Homie" very often. They usually know all these English expressions.

    Calling your friend "Freund" while you're talking with him sounds as though you want something from him, sometimes it's even misinterpreted. As usual teenager one would never say "Mein Freund ist da drüben" (My friend's over there) because one automatically thinks it's your lover. (It's the "gay thing" so most pay attention to what they say in that case.)

    I only hear "Kerl" used by women when they talk about the opposite sex. (I know that very well, 95% of my school's students are feminine) Whereas I've rarely heard it said by a guy. "Typ" is similarly used as "Kerl".

    "Alter" can also mean "Vater" (father). "Mein Alter ist grad nicht heim." (My father's not home at the moment.) But it's teenage slang.

    The most used is "Kumpel".

    Na, was geht? (What's up, homie?)
    Was geht, Leute? (What's up, folks?)
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    In Serbian:

    friend/pal/mate/dude - "ortak"; "drug"; drugar"
    friend (female) - "ortakinja"; "drugarica"; drugariška"
    bro/brother - "brate!"; "rođače!
    "What's up" - "Šta ima novo?"; "Šta ima?"
    "How's it goin' - "Šta se radi?"
    "What's up, homie" - "Šta ima, brate?"

    Pozdrav!
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Whodunit said:
    Kumpel
    Typ
    This is interesting we use these two words too.
    Kumpel has even the same meaning in Polish, it has positive connotations, and is used mainly by youngsters. Typ is used for someone you don't know as a one in a street, it can convey neutral or negative connotations.

    Back to the topic, apart from the one I mentioned at the beginning, young people in Poland also use:
    stary
    ziomal
    koleszka
    mój człowiek (as in he's my (mian) man)
    or simply:
    przyjaciel - friend


    The usage may vary according to the region, people can use different terms for a "homie" but everyone knows how to use "przyjaciel".

    If you want to use it in a given phrase; I'd go for:
    Jak leci stary?
    Co słychać stary? or Stary co słychać?

    I'd only use this one in the given context (some people would use here "ziomal" too but I don't use this word).
     

    The MEAT Maestro

    Member
    Inglese; Norte America
    Wow, this is awesome. Thanx for all the great responses. I'm still interested in any Asian, Russian, Romanian, French, and every other languages. Thanx peeps.
     

    Proximate Platypus

    New Member
    Canada - English
    Hi! :)
    I think in French a homie is "un pote" ... Friend is "un(e) ami(e)" or the less formal "un copain/une copine" which I guess could be translated as "buddy."

    I don't know many Japanese slang words but "friend" is "tomodachi."
     

    ukuca

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Turkey
    In Turkish there are lots of sayings, here are some of them:
    friend/pal/mate/dude - dostum (very close friend), arkadaş (friend), kardeş or kardeşim (bro)
    friend (female) - bacı (mostly used by villagers)
    bro/brother - birader, kardeş or kardeşim (bro)
    "What's up" - Naber (Originally "Ne haber")
    "How's it goin' - Nasıl gidiyor?
    "What's up, homie" - Ne var ne yok?
    And if you want to say "homie" meaning you are from the same country or hood, etc.. we say "hemşeri or hemşerim"
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    In Russian
    brother = brat (-a- as in sAlsa, not as in Sam).
    bro ~ bratok or bratan

    The word "bratok" has been used so widely by the criminal organizations during the merky 90's, that it is often used now to mean a present/former member of a a criminal enterpize. A stereotypical bratok is a big guy with no neck wearing a thick gold chain and driving a BMW :)D)

    Still,
    what's up homie ~~ "Nu che slyshno, bratok?"
     

    Becker

    Member
    English
    panjabigator said:
    Panjabi and Hindi: Yaar

    How does one differentiate between 'friend' and 'homie' in Panjabi and Hindi? Is it in the context? I thought yaar meant friend.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    The proper word for "friend" in Urdu (and Hindi and Gujarati) is "dost" (دوست) and that just means friend, that's it.

    Yaar is used differently I think. It is often used in the phrase "Arey yaar!" which sort of means "Oh man!" (so here it is translated as "man"). It can also be translated as "buddy", "pal", "mate" etc.
    There's a really sad Bollywood song called "Dil de diyaa hai":p from the film: Masti:D) and part of the lyrics go like:

    #..dil de diyaa hai
    jaan tumhe denge-e-e
    dagaa nahee karenge sanam..
    oh.. rab di kasam yaaraa, rab di kasam-m-m-m
    dil de diyaa hai..#

    here I would translate (the whole sentence) as "I swear to God dude.."

    So basically, "dost" is like the normal way of saying friend, slightly more formal. (and it can only mean friend) "yaar" is more like "mate"/"pal"/"buddy"/"dude" type of thing

    Please feel free to disagree (panjabigator!)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Linguist is correct. /dost/ is a tad more formal in the sense that it is just the normal word for friend, in both Hindi and Panjabi. We also say /mitr/ in Hindi and Panjabi, but less often. But /yaar/ is very colloquial....
     

    maree

    Member
    Norway/Norwegian
    If I were to adress the person (in Norwegian), I would say kompis.

    Other words are:

    venn (- friend)
    kamerat (-from comrad, but I think it's more used as a friend-word than a military/communist word in Norway)
     

    Becker

    Member
    English
    linguist786 said:
    The proper word for "friend" in Urdu (and Hindi and Gujarati) is "dost" (دوست) and that just means friend, that's it.

    Yaar is used differently I think. It is often used in the phrase "Arey yaar!" which sort of means "Oh man!" (so here it is translated as "man"). It can also be translated as "buddy", "pal", "mate" etc.
    Thanks! Appreciate it :)
     

    miu_miu

    New Member
    Sweden, swedish
    In swedish there are:
    kompis
    polare

    kamrat and vän are more formal

    Personly I think it sounds a little weird when you say something like Tjena kompis! which would be how I would translate Hi homie or something like that. If I was talking to a female friend I could say, Hur är det tjejen? which means How's it goin girl?
     
    Greek has «φίλε!» [ˈfile] (masc.), «φίλη!» [ˈfili] (fem.) or «φιλενάδα!» [fileˈnaða] (fem.) which are the vocative of «φίλος» [ˈfilos] (masc. nom.), «φίλη» [ˈfili] (fem.) --> friend.

    But...
    between friends or acquaintances, the prevalent exclamation in the colloquial language is by far «μαλάκα!» [maˈlaka] which is the vocative of «μαλάκας» [maˈlakas] (masc.), a vulgar word, with the meanings of wanker, jerk-off, self-abuser, and the contrasting dude, mate, homie, depending on context.

    -MoGr «μαλάκας» (masc.) < Byz.Gr fem. noun «μαλάκα» maláka :warning: --> masturbation < Classical adj. «μαλ(θ)ακός» măl(tʰ)ăkós (masc.) --> weak, tender, soft, mild, morally weak, in Plutarch, catamite (with obscure etymology although the Greek word has been compared to the Skt. मर्धति (mardhati), to neglect, abandon, and the Proto-Germanic *mildijaz > Ger. milde, Eng./Dt. mild).
    Interestingly, nowadays, the same word has been used as a greeting between female friends too (the masculine «μαλάκας» only, as the feminine form «μαλάκω» [maˈlako] :warning: remains a swear word).
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    homie, as in Hey, what's up, homie? or One of my homies got fired

    In Catalan: company

    Ei, com va, company?
    Van fer fora un dels meus companys.

    In European Spanish: colega

    Eh, ¿qué pasa, colega?
    Echaron a uno de mis colegas.

    Both are slightly informal when meaning 'friend'. In standard language, they mean companion, workmate/schoolmate, colleague.
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Sardinian :

    1) Compare, Cumpare -> from Latin "Cum parem" = with your peer (In Sardinian "cum pare / cum pares / 'um pare" also means "together")

    2) Cumpagnu -> from Vulgar Latin "cum paneus" adjective derived from "cum panem" = with bread = that with which you divide your bread

    3) Fedàle (literally : "of the same age") -> from Latin "Foedalis", adjective derived from "Foedus" = pact, association
     

    KalAlbè

    Senior Member
    American English & Kreyòl Ayisyen
    Haitian Creole:

    Patnè mwen = my homie. Literally means my partner. A bit dated, though.
    Young people tend to prefer: Baz

    Interesting thing about partner is that I've heard Brazilians use it in the same way to mean homie as parceiro or parça. Not sure if it's still in use or maybe regional.
     

    kloie

    Senior Member
    English
    Among teens who listen to hip hop you'll hear "Homie" very often. They usually know all these English expressions.

    Calling your friend "Freund" while you're talking with him sounds as though you want something from him, sometimes it's even misinterpreted. As usual teenager one would never say "Mein Freund ist da drüben" (My friend's over there) because one automatically thinks it's your lover. (It's the "gay thing" so most pay attention to what they say in that case.)

    I only hear "Kerl" used by women when they talk about the opposite sex. (I know that very well, 95% of my school's students are feminine) Whereas I've rarely heard it said by a guy. "Typ" is similarly used as "Kerl".

    "Alter" can also mean "Vater" (father). "Mein Alter ist grad nicht heim." (My father's not home at the moment.) But it's teenagang.

    The most used is "Kumpel".

    Na, was geht? (What's up, homie?)
    Was geht, Leute? (What's up, folks?)
    We say old man for farher

    We say my old man similar to alter.
     
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