Hook someone up with and fix someone up with

Neitzel553

Member
Paakantyi
Is there any difference between the two in the sense of providing someone with something- be it an object, a date etc? Maybe a Transatlantic difference?

I promised I'll hook/ fix him up with my cousin this summer.
Need a tie? I can hook/ fix you up with one. My roommate's got tons of them!
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In my youth, "to hook up with someone" just meant to meet. For the younger generation, it means "to have sex." The younger members of the family giggle if I suggest something like "I'll hook up with you at the mall later."
    In American English, "I'll hook you up" can mean "I'll arrange that for you" so your second sentence makes sense either way for American English.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I agree with Myridon.

    In almost all cases the verb "hook you up" is slang. We would say "I will find you a tie." Saying I will hook you up with one makes it sound like something difficult or challenging. It sound odd.

    If "that" is a service, "I'll hook you up with that" means I will get you that service. Similarly, if "that" is a hard-to-find object, "I'll hook you up with that" means I will find that for you. These come from the expression "hook up a service", meaning to connect your home with that service: electricity, gas, water, cable TV, or internet service. That narrow meaning expanded to "connecting you with" a car repairman, a drug dealer, or any other service or item.

    "I'll fix you up with Susan" has been used for many years, and "fix up" means to arrange a date between two people. If the two people have not met, we call it a "blind date" or a "fix up".

    I wouldn't say "I will hook you up with Susan". That makes Susan sound like a service. And it is too close to the (casual non-comitted) sexual expressions "Let's hook up" and "a hook-up".
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Is there any difference between the two in the sense of providing someone with something- be it an object, a date etc? Maybe a Transatlantic difference?

    I promised I'll hook/ fix him up with my cousin this summer.
    Need a tie? I can hook/ fix you up with one. My roommate's got tons of them!
    "Hook up" sounds very AE to me. In BE, I would only say "I can fix you up" with both of those. :)
     
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