hoots <on> the car horn

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
She gave three short hoots on the car horn.
Cambridge dictionary

1. Does on mean that she put her hand on the horn?
2. Would with work in the sentence as well?
Thanks.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    She gave three short hoots on the car horn.
    Cambridge dictionary

    1. Does on mean that she put her hand on the horn?
    2. Would with work in the sentence as well?
    Thanks.
    Since externally mounted car horns with squeezable bulbs on the back have not been used for a number of decades, I strongly doubt that she put her hand on the horn itself. :)

    More likely, she pressed the button that caused the horn to sound (we don't use "hoot" for car horns in AE.)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Since externally mounted car horns with squeezable bulbs on the back have not been used for a number of decades, I strongly doubt that she put her hand on the horn itself. :)

    More likely, she pressed the button that caused the horn to sound (we don't use "hoot" for car horns in AE.)
    Yes, I meant this: http://o.aolcdn.com/os/autos/photos/miscellaneous/driver-honking-a-car612x344
    Putting your hand on that button -- is this meaning of "on" used in the original example?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I see "on" in the original sentence to be in the sense of:

    I heard it on the radio.
    I saw it on TV

    Yes, you can say "with the car horn."
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thanks. As far as the verb is concerned, then I guess beeping, blaring, blowing, honking, sounding, tooting would work, too, I think:). (I'm not sure how they would go with the "gave", though)
     
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