hope you have a good holiday

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-Rebekita-

New Member
English
I am writing a postcard in Spanish. I have just finished my Spanish A-Level but I'm not always too sharp on verb grammar - i.e where to use subjunctive, etc.

So, I want to start my postcard with something like this: "I hope you have a good summer holiday."

In Spanish I want to say it using these words:
"Espero que * buenas vacaciones"

What do I use where the star is!? Pasar or Tener? In the future or subjunctive? What is the best way to put it?

PS When I say holiday, they're not actually going away on holiday, she's a teacher and I'm referring to the school summer break :)

Thank you!
 
  • marchie

    Senior Member
    Spanish/Spain
    You can use both verbs here, pasar or tener, but both in the subjunctive:

    Espero que pases unas buenas vacaciones.
    Espero que tengas unas buenas vacaciones.

    Hope it helps.
     

    roanheads

    Senior Member
    Scotland, english
    ¿Por qué usas "a" antes de "good holiday"? ¿Es obligatorio?:D
    No es obligatorio,porque en inglés se puede decir " holiday " tanto en singular, como " holidays " en plural, mientras que en castellano, parece que siempre se dicen " vacaciones " en plural.
    I hope you have a good holiday ( de quince días o un día )
    I hope you have good holidays ( de quince días)

    Pero en castellano, el articulo indefinido " uno/a " tiene plural " unos/unas, el inglés no tiene plural de " a ",
    Por lo tanto, si se trata de un sustantivo que siempre va en plural " vacaciones " , " tijeras ", etc, entonces se escriben unas vacaciones, mientras que en inglés se escribe " a holiday "
    Espero que tengas unas buenas vacaciones.de verano----- I hope you have a good summer holiday.
    Un poco complicado, espero haberme explicado bien.
    Saludos.
     
    Last edited:

    ascension

    Senior Member
    English-United States
    Pero en castellano, el articulo indefinido " uno/a " tiene plural " unos/unas, el inglés no tiene plural de " a ",
    Por lo tanto, si se trata de un sustantivo que siempre va en plural " vacaciones " , " tijeras ", etc, entonces se escriben unas vacaciones, mientras que en inglés se escribe " a holiday "
    Esa es la duda que tenía, gracias roanheads.
     

    roanheads

    Senior Member
    Scotland, english
    Me alegro de haberte ayudado.
    In case you are not familiar with " tijeras" ( while we are on the subject of "unas ") perhaps it is worth mentioning that " unas tijeras " means to us " a ( pair ) of scissors, although of course we can say " the scissors "

    Cheers.
     

    Oldy Nuts

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Chile
    Me alegro de haberte ayudado.
    In case you are not familiar with " tijeras" ( while we are on the subject of "unas ") perhaps it is worth mentioning that " unas tijeras " means to us " a ( pair ) of scissors, although of course we can say " the scissors "

    Cheers.
    Can you also say "a scissor", like "a holiday"?
     

    ascension

    Senior Member
    English-United States
    Can you also say "a scissor", like "a holiday"?
    I don't think so. I'm not sure if the word actually exists or not as a noun, but I've never heard it and it sounds pretty odd. That said, if you were to ask for a scissor it would be understood.
     

    roanheads

    Senior Member
    Scotland, english
    Can you also say "a scissor", like "a holiday"?
    Hi Oldy,
    I agree with Aud, scissors exists as a plural noun. We would always ask for a pair of scissors or the scissors, but to ask for a scissor would probably be understood.
    However, I have seen it used in the singular , as in "a scissor kick "

    Saludos.
     
    Last edited:

    Oldy Nuts

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Chile
    Hi Oldy,
    I agree with Aud, scissors exists as a plural noun. We would always ask for a pair of scissors or the scissors, but to ask for a scissor would probably be understood.
    However, I have seen it used in the singular , as in "a scissor kick "

    Saludos.
    Hi roanhead:

    Thanks for the explanation, although I think that in your example "scissor" is an adjective and not a noun, and so it's a different case.

    Incidentally, the word "vacación" does exist in Spanish, but at least in this corner of the world, the usual thing is to talk about "las vacaciones" to refer to the summer and/or legal vacation. In Chile, the only use of the singular form that I can recall is in the diminutive form "una vacacioncita" we use when talking about a few days one can take off for reasons like a long weekend etc.
     

    roanheads

    Senior Member
    Scotland, english
    Hola Oldy,
    Gracias por tus comentatios.
    Nos veremos en el foro.
    í Qué tengas buen fin de semana.!
     
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