horned Celtic camp

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aalvares

Member
European Portuguese
Hello,

I'm having a problem with horns... hope you can help me.

This is the description of a thunderstorm in West Country (unfortunately I've never been there) and I'm having trouble understanding the meaning of "horned".

The thunder growled around the sky like a prowling lion. Lightning flashed like scimitars around the horned Celtic camp on the hill beyond us.

Does this mean that the camp has horns all over, or that it has horns maybe over its gate (I've never been to a Celtic camp either...)?

Celtic camp refers to an area where Celts lived and is now delimited and probably destined to visitors/tourists, doesn'it it?

Thank you very much,

Ana
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    What is the background; when does this take place? Were there any celts present? It sounds to me as if the camp itself has horns on it, however there is too little context and background to be certain.
     

    aalvares

    Member
    European Portuguese
    This takes place at present, in the West Country; so no more Celtic people living in the camp I believe. That's the only reference to the camp in the book.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi,

    Given the nature of the text (thunderbolts like scimitars? :rolleyes:), I would have assumed that it's a sort of poetic way of describing monoliths on a field.

    Just a thought.



    P.S. Panj... :p:D
     
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    aalvares

    Member
    European Portuguese
    It could be; but it's so different from the scimitars and thunderstorm description that it doesn't seem to fit the style - scimitars and thunderstom like comparisons are very frequent though...
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Is the writer an expert on Celts, or someone likely to have researched this particular point?
    It's possible that he has come across "horned Celtic" in other contexts where we celts might find it appropriate and has presumed it was the kind of description you could equally well apply to a camp.
     

    aalvares

    Member
    European Portuguese
    I don't think the writer is an expert on Celts.. Trisia is probably right!

    Thank you all for your help,

    Ana
     

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The iron age Celtic camps in Cornwall are often described as horned in shape, because the ramparts extended out in a semicircle, crescent shape, usually over a rocky penisnsula. Nowadays it´s thought that many of them actually were animal pens or temporary settlements but certainly the Celtic practice in the West Country was to dig ramparts in a crescent shape so that you only needed to guard the one entrance. It was hard work for the Celts to dig through all that granite so if you only do it on three sides, it makes sense!
     
    Last edited:

    aalvares

    Member
    European Portuguese
    Thank you Lis,
    After all the writer knows something about Celts; I will look for a good book in Portuguese myself.
     
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