Hot dog(s), toast(s)

hunnyball_lector

Member
Serbian
Hello! I was wondering if it's okay to use possibly countable nouns that represent dishes/drinks as uncountable.

Ben likes hot dog. (Is it okay that I put it this way or do I have to say "Ben likes hot dogs"?)
This is chicken broth. (This sentence refers to the picture in which a plate of chicken broth is shown)
I like to eat toast with jam for breakfast.
 
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  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    As for the other two, you certainly can say "I like to eat toast with jam."
    "Kitchen broth" makes little sense in English. Beef broth (which can be uncountable) is broth made of beef, and chicken broth (which can be uncountable) is broth made of chicken -- but what is "kitchen broth"? A broth made of kitchens?:confused:
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't know what 'kitchen broth', but 'broth' can be both countable and uncountable, depending on context.

    'Toast' is uncountable. So you won't see 'toasts'.
     

    Hercules Grytpype-Thynne

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    'Toast' is uncountable. So you won't see 'toasts'.
    Actually you will, but the usage is quite restricted. It's used to identify certain pre-packaged toasted snacks known in the food trade as "mini toasts". I've never seen "toast" (for "toasted bread", not for "words spoken before drinking") used as a countable noun except in this one context.
     
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